Ionization Energies

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JulieAljamal1E
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:24 am

Ionization Energies

Postby JulieAljamal1E » Thu Oct 25, 2018 9:43 am

When going across the periodic table ionization energy tends to increase. Nitrogen would have the tendency to gain electrons while Lithium would tend to lose an electron. What about elements in group 4 of the periodic table? Would they "rather" lose 4 electrons or gain 4 electrons?

Tyler Vu 4I
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

Re: Ionization Energies

Postby Tyler Vu 4I » Thu Oct 25, 2018 10:05 am

Losing four electrons would require a large amount of energy. The ionization energies for 4 electron removals with the elements of the group 14 would be very high. This way it would be more likely for them to gain 4 electrons to reach a stable state.

Alicia Gibbons 1B
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:17 am

Re: Ionization Energies

Postby Alicia Gibbons 1B » Thu Oct 25, 2018 10:41 am

You're referring to Group 4, which consists of transition metals. Transition metals form cations, although with varying charges. They would lose electrons - not gain electrons, but for most transition metal elements, the number of electrons lost would vary. I believe the other poster is talking about Group 14 elements, which would gain four electrons to form an octet (eg CH4).

Kevin ODonnell 2B
Posts: 62
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:24 am

Re: Ionization Energies

Postby Kevin ODonnell 2B » Thu Oct 25, 2018 10:45 am

Tyler Vu 4I wrote:Losing four electrons would require a large amount of energy. The ionization energies for 4 electron removals with the elements of the group 14 would be very high. This way it would be more likely for them to gain 4 electrons to reach a stable state.


That is a very good point. It is especially true considering it takes dramatically more energy to remove the second electron than the first and so on. For example for Al it takes 577.6 kJ/mol to remove the 1st electron, 1816.6 for the second, 2744.7 for the third, and 11,577 for the fourth. Looking at these numbers it makes sense why it is a lot easier to gain 4 electrons than lose all four.


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