Electron Affinity Trend

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Venya Vaddi 1L
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Electron Affinity Trend

Postby Venya Vaddi 1L » Thu Oct 25, 2018 8:43 pm

Can someone explain why electron affinity is the highest for elements in the top right of the periodic table?

Chem_Mod
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Re: Electron Affinity Trend

Postby Chem_Mod » Thu Oct 25, 2018 9:04 pm

Electron affinity is defined as the energy released when you add an e- to a gas phase atom to form a -1 ion. Elements at the top right have the highest electron affinity because they release the most energy to form that -1 ion. One explanation is that they become most stable when they gain that e-. For example, fluorine is a halogen, and if it gains an e-, it gains a noble gas configuration, which is very stable and low in energy. Therefore, it has the highest electron affinity because it becomes most stable when it gains that electron.

Kyle Golden Dis 2G
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Re: Electron Affinity Trend

Postby Kyle Golden Dis 2G » Thu Oct 25, 2018 9:05 pm

The elements on the top right of the periodic table have a negative (-) charge, which means they really want one electron to be neutral. This means they also have a high electron affinity.

Swetha Ampabathina1I
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Re: Electron Affinity Trend

Postby Swetha Ampabathina1I » Thu Oct 25, 2018 9:12 pm

Most nonmetals have a higher electron affinity since they have more valence electrons than metals and can easily attract more electrons and fulfill their octet. Also, nonmetals' valence electron shell is closer to the nucleus thus making it harder to remove electrons and easier for those elements to attract/remove an electron from another element (most likely a metal).

Rami_Z_AbuQubo_2K
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Re: Electron Affinity Trend

Postby Rami_Z_AbuQubo_2K » Sat Oct 27, 2018 10:27 pm

The further right you go, the more electro-negative an element is and the further up you go the more electro-negative an element becomes. Elements in the top right corner are the most electro-negative while those in the bottom left are the least electro-negative. Hope that helps..

Tony Ong 3K
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Re: Electron Affinity Trend

Postby Tony Ong 3K » Sat Oct 27, 2018 10:38 pm

Something that is also interesting is that Chlorine actually has a higher electron affinity than Fluorine. Fluorine is smaller than Chlorine, therefore there is less space availalbe in its 2p orbital. Chlorine's outer orbital is a 3p, so therefore there's more space for electrons to be shared in this space with one another.

Sang Hyoun Hong 3G
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Re: Electron Affinity Trend

Postby Sang Hyoun Hong 3G » Sun Oct 28, 2018 9:16 pm

The elements on the top right of the periodic table tend to be more electronegative because the nucleus exerts a stronger pull on the outer electrons and thus form octet configurations more easily.

Ahmed Mahmood 4D
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Re: Electron Affinity Trend

Postby Ahmed Mahmood 4D » Sun Oct 28, 2018 9:30 pm

Since electrons in the top right corner of the periodic table are closest to attaining eight valence electrons, they release more energy in order to receive that eighth electron and fill their outer shell.

Jackie Ngo 1C
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Re: Electron Affinity Trend

Postby Jackie Ngo 1C » Sun Oct 28, 2018 9:49 pm

As you travel up and towards the right across the periodic table, elements become more and more electronegative, therefore have a higher electron affinity (attractiveness). This is because as you go right, there's an increase in valence electrons, and electrons are more attracted to valence shells that are more full. Also, as you go up, atoms get smaller and n (the number of shells/outermost shell) gets smaller, they tend to have a higher electron affinity too!

Andreana Vetus 1A
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Re: Electron Affinity Trend

Postby Andreana Vetus 1A » Sun Oct 28, 2018 9:54 pm

Can someone explain the difference between electron affinity, electronegativity, and ionization energy? Is there a way to easily distinguish the three?


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