Electron Affinity

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Sana_Mian_3G
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am

Electron Affinity

Postby Sana_Mian_3G » Fri Oct 26, 2018 10:34 am

What are the trends in the periodic table related to electron affinity? Also, is there any way to memorize it?

Katie_Duong_1D
Posts: 69
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

Re: Electron Affinity

Postby Katie_Duong_1D » Fri Oct 26, 2018 10:47 am

Electron affinity has a less periodic trend (i.e. no rule for increasing across period/going down a group). Generally, high electron affinity elements are in the top right of the periodic table.

cristinapadilla_1E
Posts: 33
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: Electron Affinity

Postby cristinapadilla_1E » Fri Oct 26, 2018 11:02 am

In terms of electron affinity, there are patterns that you must recognize and memorize. As you go across a period, electron affinity increases. As you go down a group, electron affinity decreases.

Aaron Ang 4H
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Re: Electron Affinity

Postby Aaron Ang 4H » Fri Oct 26, 2018 11:04 am

Also, another trend for electron affinity can be seen when you go diagonally from the bottom left to the top right of the periodic table. Chlorine has the greatest electron affinity.

MaiaRodriguezChoi3E
Posts: 32
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: Electron Affinity

Postby MaiaRodriguezChoi3E » Fri Oct 26, 2018 2:19 pm

I think that looking at it diagonally from the bottom left to top right is probably the easiest way to look at the trend for electron affinity

Athena L 1B
Posts: 59
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: Electron Affinity

Postby Athena L 1B » Sat Oct 27, 2018 12:10 am

It's also basically the same trend as electronegativity.

Cade Okohira 4K
Posts: 47
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:15 am

Re: Electron Affinity

Postby Cade Okohira 4K » Sat Oct 27, 2018 12:08 pm

The textbook asks this question but I don't understand how to answer it.

How do you account for the large decrease in electron affinity between, for example, lithium and beryllium?

Chloe Qiao 4C
Posts: 65
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

Re: Electron Affinity

Postby Chloe Qiao 4C » Sat Oct 27, 2018 12:14 pm

I believe in the case of lithium and beryllium, lithium has only one electron in its 2s orbital but beryllium has two, which means the 2s orbital of beryllium is already full. Therefore, beryllium is like the noble gases in some way, when you add additional electron to its already full shell, it requires energy rather than release it.

Megan_Ervin_1F
Posts: 78
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: Electron Affinity

Postby Megan_Ervin_1F » Sat Oct 27, 2018 5:18 pm

What exactly is electron affinity and WHY does it increase towards the upper right diagonally?


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