Ionization Energy  [ENDORSED]

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Peter Nguyen 2I
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:29 am

Ionization Energy

Postby Peter Nguyen 2I » Sun Oct 28, 2018 1:30 pm

Why does ionization energy increase as you move to the right of the periodic table?

megansardina2G
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am
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Re: Ionization Energy

Postby megansardina2G » Sun Oct 28, 2018 1:45 pm

Ionization energy can be defined as the amount of energy required to remove one (or more) electron(s) from a neutral atom to form a positively charged ion. This increases across a period due to the increasing number of valence electrons across a period. For example, an alkali metal such as potassium (K) only has one valence electron, and tends to want to give it away to other, more electronegative molecules. However, a halogen such as fluoride (F) has 7 valence electrons and wants to complete its valence electron octet to reach a more stable state rather than give away an electron and only have 6 remaining. Due to this tendency, much more energy is required to remove an electron from fluoride than potassium, so it is said that the trend of ionization energy increases across a period. Hope this helps!

804991762_4A
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Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:04 am

Re: Ionization Energy

Postby 804991762_4A » Sun Oct 28, 2018 1:45 pm

Its because the atomic radii decrease across a period, so the electrons are in the same shell closer to the nucleus and the increased nuclear charge attracts them closer to the center. Since its closer to the center its harder to remove an electron, and from here you can consider the octet rule where it wants to keep its electrons because it wants to satisfy the octet rule.

Quinn_Simpson_3D
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:26 am

Re: Ionization Energy  [ENDORSED]

Postby Quinn_Simpson_3D » Sun Oct 28, 2018 2:26 pm

Ionization energy as you go across a period because there are more electrons in the valence shell. Since a full shell is the most stable, elements with less valence electrons are more readily able to lose their electrons because they will be closer to a full shell. And since elements with close to a full shell of electrons want to reach a full shell as well, they more readily keep their electrons and try to gain more. Furthermore, ionic radius decreases across a period, requiring more energy to remove an electron.

SophiaKohlhoff4B
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:16 am

Re: Ionization Energy

Postby SophiaKohlhoff4B » Sun Oct 28, 2018 7:42 pm

Ionic radii decreases across a period (from left to right on the period table). The closer an electron is to the nucleus, the more difficult it will be to remove, therefore requiring a greater ionization energy.

Selina Bellin 2B
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: Ionization Energy

Postby Selina Bellin 2B » Sun Oct 28, 2018 8:27 pm

it increases across a row because as protons are added, the force of attraction is stronger and therefore it is more difficult to remove an electron

Selina Bellin 2B
Posts: 62
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: Ionization Energy

Postby Selina Bellin 2B » Sun Oct 28, 2018 8:27 pm

it increases across a row because as protons are added, the force of attraction is stronger and therefore it is more difficult to remove an electron

Layla Manoochehri
Posts: 29
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Re: Ionization Energy

Postby Layla Manoochehri » Sun Oct 28, 2018 9:24 pm

can someone explain why the ionization energy for oxygen is lower than the ionization energy for nitrogen or fluorine?


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