Electron affinity

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Adrienne_4F
Posts: 64
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

Electron affinity

Postby Adrienne_4F » Wed Oct 31, 2018 6:56 pm

Can someone explain electron affinity and how it applies to the periodic table?

Angela Grant 1D
Posts: 67
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: Electron affinity

Postby Angela Grant 1D » Wed Oct 31, 2018 7:06 pm

Electron affinity is the energy released when an electron is added to a gas-phase atom. You can think of it as how much an atom attracts an electron. On the periodic table, it is highest on the upper right (with the exception of noble gases since they have full valence shells).

Jeannine 1I
Posts: 73
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

Re: Electron affinity

Postby Jeannine 1I » Wed Oct 31, 2018 7:34 pm

I was also very confused by the book definition, but my TA explained electron affinity by saying it's basically how badly an atom wants an electron. The atoms that need only a few more electrons to have a full shell, want electrons much more than those that need many more electrons to fill in their shell.

For example, since Fluorine only needs one more electron to have a full shell, its electron affinity is much much higher than Carbon, which needs 4 electrons to fill its shell.

305376058
Posts: 35
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Electron affinity

Postby 305376058 » Sun Oct 20, 2019 11:04 pm

Electron affinity is essentially how attracted an atom is to an electron. It is highest toward the upper right part of the periodic table with the exception of the noble gases because their shells are already filled.

Siya Shah 1J
Posts: 50
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Electron affinity

Postby Siya Shah 1J » Sun Oct 20, 2019 11:07 pm

Electron affinity is essentially the amount of energy released when an electron is added to a neutral atom in the gaseous state. Electron affinity increases as you go up the periodic table as well as when you go left to right on the periodic table. The added electrons become closer to the nucleus, creating a larger Ze charge.

Sean Tran 2K
Posts: 55
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Electron affinity

Postby Sean Tran 2K » Sun Oct 20, 2019 11:46 pm

The trend for electron affinity and electronegativity is the same, but what are the differences between the two? Or rather, how similar or they?


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