Homework Question 1F.19

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Victoria Zheng--2F
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Homework Question 1F.19

Postby Victoria Zheng--2F » Thu Oct 24, 2019 6:28 pm

Homework Question 1F.19 asks why are s-block metals typically more reactive than p-block metals? I don't really know the answer to this question. Is it because s-block metals have lower ionization energy?

Sahil Jog 1F
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Re: Homework Question 1F.19

Postby Sahil Jog 1F » Thu Oct 24, 2019 6:32 pm

S-block metals are typically more reactive than p-block metals because they have a lower ionization energy, because of greater distance between the nucleus and the valence electrons. Furthermore, since s-block metals also typically have less electrons to lose than the p-block metals, they would be more reactive.

Rory Simpson 2F
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Re: Homework Question 1F.19

Postby Rory Simpson 2F » Thu Oct 24, 2019 6:33 pm

The lower ionization energy means that the s-block metals are very likely to lose their valence electrons. This tendency makes them highly reactive.

nicole-2B
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Re: Homework Question 1F.19

Postby nicole-2B » Thu Oct 24, 2019 8:35 pm

Since s-block has a much lower ionization energy than the p-block so they lose electrons with less energy making them highly reactive

Jenna Ortiguerra 4G
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Re: Homework Question 1F.19

Postby Jenna Ortiguerra 4G » Fri Oct 25, 2019 12:51 am

S-blocks are typically more reactive than p-block metals because as you move across a period in the periodic table, ionization energy increases. The s-block is more on the left of the periodic table compared to p-blocks so the ionization energy of the s-block is lower, which means that it is easier for them to lose electrons, so they are more reactive.

andrewcj 2C
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Re: Homework Question 1F.19

Postby andrewcj 2C » Fri Oct 25, 2019 12:59 am

Does anyone else find the wording a little ambiguous? Because I think you can make the argument that fluorine is extremely reactive too, due to how close it is to a noble gas electron configuration, but fluorine is definitely not an s-block metal. In this case, fluorine readily takes electrons from other atoms around it, causing it to react. This leads me to find the wording of the problem troublesome.


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