Ionization Energy from the Review

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Jedrick Zablan 3L
Posts: 68
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Ionization Energy from the Review

Postby Jedrick Zablan 3L » Sat Nov 02, 2019 2:02 pm

Yesterday, Lyndon showed an exception to the Ionization Energy trend where Nitrogen had more than Oxygen. Can someone please explain why?

Simon Dionson 4I
Posts: 107
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Ionization Energy from the Review

Postby Simon Dionson 4I » Sat Nov 02, 2019 2:49 pm

In the 2p orbital, all nitrogen's are half-filled with electrons whereas oxygen has one full orbital and two half-filled orbitals. This first full orbital in oxygen has greater electron repulsion than the first half-full orbital in nitrogen, which makes it easier to remove an electron

SnehinRajkumar1L
Posts: 101
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Ionization Energy from the Review

Postby SnehinRajkumar1L » Sat Nov 02, 2019 2:49 pm

The half-filled p orbital is more stable than the p orbital of oxygen. It is easier for an oxygen atom to lose/gain an electron to fill up the remaining unpaired shells as it is in a more unstable form.

Megan Jung 3A
Posts: 50
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Ionization Energy from the Review

Postby Megan Jung 3A » Sat Nov 02, 2019 2:55 pm

If you look at the electron configuration for nitrogen N, the p orbital is half filled with electrons. This is actually a more stable orbital compared to the oxygen O orbital. Therefore, N has a higher ionization energy because it will take more energy to remove an electron from a more stable orbital.

Diana Chavez-Carrillo 2L
Posts: 122
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: Ionization Energy from the Review

Postby Diana Chavez-Carrillo 2L » Mon Nov 04, 2019 1:52 pm

So then when it comes to ionization energy is the only exemptions nitrogen and oxygen? Are the rest of the elements still increasing in ionization energy going up and across to the right of the periodic table which is the same trend as electronegativity on the periodic table?


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