O versus N Ionization Energy

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Jessica Hu 3L
Posts: 51
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:46 pm

O versus N Ionization Energy

Postby Jessica Hu 3L » Sat Dec 12, 2020 11:43 pm

What's the reasoning again for Oxygen having a lower ionization energy than Nitrogen?

Joseph Hsing 2C
Posts: 91
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:42 pm

Re: O versus N Ionization Energy

Postby Joseph Hsing 2C » Sat Dec 12, 2020 11:51 pm

This is because oxygen has one more electron than a half-full orbital as in nitrogen with 3 of 6 p filled. So the energy needed to remove that outlier electron on oxygen will be lower despite the normal trend of ionization energy increasing down a period.

Arnav Saud 2C
Posts: 117
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:51 pm

Re: O versus N Ionization Energy

Postby Arnav Saud 2C » Sat Dec 12, 2020 11:54 pm

I believe its caused by the electron-electron repulsion of the extra electron that oxygen has. It weakens electron shielding which lowers its ionization energy.

jessicaosuna_1F
Posts: 98
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:51 pm

Re: O versus N Ionization Energy

Postby jessicaosuna_1F » Sat Dec 12, 2020 11:57 pm

From what I gather, it has to do with the electron configuration. Since N has half of its 2p shell filled with electrons it is more stable, whereas Oxygen has an extra electron there so it is more likely to want to lose the electron to become more stable.

Gicelle Rubin 1E
Posts: 81
Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2020 12:16 am

Re: O versus N Ionization Energy

Postby Gicelle Rubin 1E » Sun Dec 13, 2020 12:50 am

I myself am not entirely sure. I just know it has something to do with their electron configuration. Thank you for asking this question since I was also wondering the same thing!

Valerie Tran 2B
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:48 pm
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Re: O versus N Ionization Energy

Postby Valerie Tran 2B » Sun Dec 13, 2020 12:56 am

This is due to an electron being added to an already half full orbital in oxygen, which results in electron-electron repulsion, which will lower the ionization energy. The 2p sublevel for N has one electron in each orbital. O has two electrons in the first orbital and one in each of the other two orbitals. There is greater electronic repulsion in the 2p sublevel for O than N. Therefore, it is easier to remove an electron from the O than the N, and the ionization energy of O is lower than N. Also N is more stable due to half-filled shells


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