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diatomic elements

Posted: Thu Oct 04, 2018 11:55 pm
by Leslie Cheng 4B
Hi! Can someone explain to me why diatomic elements form, and how to distinguish between whether an element is existing in its diatomic form or not? For example, if a problem involves a diatomic element like oxygen, do you assume that's in a diatomic form, or does the problem have to state explicitly "oxygen gas"?

Re: diatomic elements

Posted: Fri Oct 05, 2018 12:07 am
by Erin Kim 2G
All the elements in the acronym HOFBrINCl, (hydrogen, oxygen, fluorine, Bromine, Iodine, and chlorine) are included in the diatomic elements. Any time these elements are listed in a chemical equation they must have the subscript of 2 as you always assume they are diatomic.

Re: diatomic elements

Posted: Fri Oct 05, 2018 5:10 am
by Elias Omar 1G
The reason these elements are diatomic is because they don't have enough electrons to fill up their valence shells. Thus, they cannot exist as a single atom.

Re: diatomic elements

Posted: Fri Oct 05, 2018 5:17 am
by Ashish Verma 2I
One cheap mnemonic device to remember these is: Never Have Fear Of Ice CoLd Bread
Never: Nitrogen
Have: Hydrogen
Fear: Fluorine
Of: Oxygen
Ice: Iodine
CoLd: Chlorine
Bread: Bromine

Re: diatomic elements

Posted: Fri Oct 05, 2018 9:16 am
by Ester Garcia 1F
My TA taught us another method to remember the diatomic elements. She refers to them as gens and ines. Ex. HydroGEN and fluorINE

Re: diatomic elements

Posted: Fri Oct 05, 2018 9:35 am
by AJ Manzano 3K
For me, it helps when I picture them on the periodic table because, with the exception of Hydrogen, the other six elements (C, N, O, F, Cl, Br, I) border the top right hand corner of the table next to the column of noble gases.

Re: diatomic elements

Posted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 7:53 pm
by inlovewithchemistry
In high school, we learned to remember them with a phrase pronounced "Br-inkl-hoff," which is Br(bromine), I(iodine), N (nitrogen), Cl(chlorine), H(hydrogen), O(oxygen), and F(fluorine). Helped me a lot back then and now.

Re: diatomic elements

Posted: Sat Oct 13, 2018 8:33 pm
by Aili Ye 4L
Some elements exist as diatomic elements since in their original state, their valence shells are not filled, thus they share electrons between each other and thus fill their shells and achieve a state of lower energy.

Re: diatomic elements

Posted: Sat Oct 13, 2018 8:54 pm
by Andrew Lam 3B
Diatomics exist to share electrons covalently and achieve a lower energy state.

HOFBrINCl is a metonym to remember the diatomics:
H- Hydrogen
O- Oxygen
F- Fluorine
Br- Bromine
I- Iodine
N- Nitrogen
Cl- Chlorine

Re: diatomic elements

Posted: Sat Oct 13, 2018 9:01 pm
by Karina Jiayu Xu 4E
Does anyone know what order to put the elements in when writing an empirical formula?

Re: diatomic elements

Posted: Sun Oct 14, 2018 2:50 pm
by Rhea Churi 4K
Karina Jiayu Xu 4E wrote:Does anyone know what order to put the elements in when writing an empirical formula?


In an empirical formula, it's typically C, H, and then other elements follow in alphabetical order.

Re: diatomic elements

Posted: Mon Oct 15, 2018 1:45 am
by yuetao4k
Diatomic elements only need to exist in pairs of atoms when they are standing alone. For instance, in OH-, you wouldn't need two hydrogen atoms because the hydrogen is not free standing. However, if you have hydrogen gas, you would need H2 because it is not attached to a different element.

Re: diatomic elements

Posted: Thu Nov 15, 2018 11:05 pm
by 705022748
Elements are diatomic because their valence shells aren't completely filled by electrons; therefore, electrons are shared a lower energy state is achieved.