Figuring out the names of things

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Katherine Wu 1H
Posts: 63
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:15 am

Figuring out the names of things

Postby Katherine Wu 1H » Fri Sep 27, 2019 7:30 pm

Write the name of the oxide, SnO2.
Is there a formulaic way of figuring out the name or is it just something that I need to look up? Is it as simple as just tin oxide or are the tin oxides numbered?

Harry Zhang 1B
Posts: 67
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Figuring out the names of things

Postby Harry Zhang 1B » Fri Sep 27, 2019 8:18 pm

There is a formula for figuring out how to write the name of certain chemical compounds. In order to do this, we need to first put different chemical compounds into different categories.

Binary compounds can be divided in to three categories, binary ionic compound, binary covalent compound, and binary acid. The naming formula of binary ionic compound is: name of metal-root of nonmetal+ide. For example, NaCl can be read as sodium chloride. The naming formula for binary covalent compound is: name of nonmetal-root of the other nonmetal+ide. Something important to know is that we only use prefixes, such as mono, di, tri, tetra, in binary covalent compound. Some rules for using prefixes include: we do not put mono in front of the first nonmetal and we do not put any prefix in front of the first element if it's hydrogen. For example, N2O4 can be read as dinitrogen tetroxide. For binary acid, the naming formula is: hydro-root of the anion-ic+acid. For example, HCl can be read as hydrochloric acid.

For naming a compound with polyatomic ion, the naming formula is: name of the metal-name of the polyatomic ion. For example, MgSO4 can be read as magnesium sulfate and AlPO4 can be read as aluminum phosphate. For this particular type of compound, you do need to memorize the names of polyatomic ions to be able to use the naming formula, and you can see a list of these ions on the internet.

For naming an oxyacid, the first step is to discern the polyatomic ion in the compound. We change all names ending in ite to ous, and ate to ic and add acid at the end of the name. We will use the HClO series here to explain. In HClO, the polyatomic ion is ClO, which is named hypochlorite. The compound is then called hypochlorous acid. For ions ending in ate, such as the chlorate in HClO3, we name the whole compound as chloric acid. For this particular type of compound, you do need to memorize the names of polyatomic ions to be able to use the naming formula, and you can see a list of these ions on the internet.

Hope this helps!

Alan Wu
Posts: 61
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Figuring out the names of things

Postby Alan Wu » Sat Sep 28, 2019 4:37 pm

Since tin can have multiple charges, SnO2 must be named as Tin (II) Oxide. This is how you name any ionic compound in which the metal can have multiple charges. Whereas an element like magnesium with only one possible charge (2+) would combine with oxygen to form magnesium oxide.

Tiffany Vo 3G
Posts: 52
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Figuring out the names of things

Postby Tiffany Vo 3G » Sat Sep 28, 2019 10:03 pm

I think SnO2 is actually considered Tin (IV) oxide. You would have to look at the oxidation states of the individual atoms to determine if it was Tin (IV) or Tin (II). Oxygen tends to have an oxidation state of -2, and the oxidation state of neutral compounds is zero, so to be SnO2, the oxidation state of Sn would have to be +4. 4 (from the Sn) + 2 oxygen atoms each with an oxidation state of -2 would cancel out to equal zero.

Amy Pham 1D
Posts: 68
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Figuring out the names of things

Postby Amy Pham 1D » Sun Sep 29, 2019 12:59 pm

Yes, SnO2 would be named tin (IV) oxide, since oxygen's oxidation state is typically 2- and there are two of them, resulting in a 4- to be balanced out by tin's 4+. But Sn oxidation options are actually either 2+ or 4+, not 2+ and 3+.

And just as a side note, the sign should be indicated after the number in oxidation states. Sign preceding number generally indicates charge. Hope this helps!


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