Avogadro's Number

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205192823
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Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:19 am

Avogadro's Number

Postby 205192823 » Thu Oct 03, 2019 12:16 pm

Do you use the Avogadro's number when you have to convert the the number of atoms to moles? Q:E7

LReedy_3I
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Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby LReedy_3I » Thu Oct 03, 2019 12:24 pm

Yes, Avogadro's number is the number of atoms in one mole. For E7, I divided 2.1x10^9 atoms of carbon by 6.022x10^23 to determine the number of moles to be 3.5x10^-15 mol.

205192823
Posts: 48
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:19 am

Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby 205192823 » Thu Oct 03, 2019 1:13 pm

LReedy_3I wrote:Yes, Avogadro's number is the number of atoms in one mole. For E7, I divided 2.1x10^9 atoms of carbon by 6.022x10^23 to determine the number of moles to be 3.5x10^-15 mol.

Thank you!

Maya Pakulski 3D
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Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Maya Pakulski 3D » Thu Oct 03, 2019 2:49 pm

Slide 5 of this power point ( https://www.slideshare.net/smartensen/mole-calculations) has a good diagram to show how to convert from atoms, moles, grams and liters!

Letty Liu 1K
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Letty Liu 1K » Thu Oct 03, 2019 4:28 pm

Yes because Avogadro’s number represents the amount of something contained in one mole.

Maya Gollamudi 1J
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Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Maya Gollamudi 1J » Thu Oct 03, 2019 4:34 pm

Yes, Avogadro's number represents the number of objects, in this case, atoms, in 1 mole. For problem E7, you divide the given number of atoms (2.1 x 10^9) by Avogadro's number (6.022 x 10^23) to determine the number of moles of carbon present.

Trent Yamamoto 4I
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Trent Yamamoto 4I » Thu Oct 03, 2019 9:22 pm

Since Avogadro's number represents the number of atoms in 1 mole. On E7, you would divide 2.1 x 10^9 by Avogadro's number (6.022 x 10^23) to get the number of moles of Carbon.

Claire Grover 3G
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Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Claire Grover 3G » Thu Oct 03, 2019 9:40 pm

Yes, because Avogadro's Number represents the amount of atoms per mole. Therefore when given the amount of moles you divide by Avogadro's Number to get the amount of atoms.

Alison Trinh 1A
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Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Alison Trinh 1A » Thu Oct 03, 2019 9:56 pm

Avogadro's number is used when converting from the number of "things" or "objects" such as atoms or molecules to the chemical amount (the number of moles).


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