Textbook question E.1

Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

Kaili Valenzuela 2B
Posts: 87
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:55 pm

Textbook question E.1

Postby Kaili Valenzuela 2B » Thu Oct 08, 2020 5:07 pm

Hello! I'm having trouble figuring out how to answer this question if someone can please walk me through it?

The field of nanotechnology offers some intriguing possibilities, such as the creation of fibers one atom wide. Suppose you were able to string together 1.00 mol Ag atoms, each of radius 144 pm, into one of these fibers by encapsulating them in carbon nanotubes. How long would the fiber extend?

thanks!

Chem_Mod
Posts: 19540
Joined: Thu Aug 04, 2011 1:53 pm
Has upvoted: 882 times

Re: Textbook question E.1

Postby Chem_Mod » Thu Oct 08, 2020 5:10 pm

Hello! To start this question, convert moles to atoms using Avogadro's number. Next use the atomic radius. Since the radius is 144pm, the diameter would be 288pm, providing the total length. Multiply by a factor of 288pm/1 atom Ag. You can then convert pm to m and km!

Brandon Gruender 3F
Posts: 86
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:03 pm

Re: Textbook question E.1

Postby Brandon Gruender 3F » Thu Oct 08, 2020 5:13 pm

HI!
So first I would change the radius to diameter, so multiply the 144 by 2. Next you need to find how many atoms come in one mole of Ag, and to do that you would multiply 1 mole by 6.02x10^23 (avagadro's constant). When you find out how many atoms, multiply that by 288 pm (the length each atom takes up). After you get this number, divide by 1x10^-12 to convert pm to m. After you are in meters, divide by 1000 to get to kilometers, and the final answer should be 8.6688x10^11 km. There is also an answer sheet to these questions on the sapling homepage, titled ATKINS 7E SSM. Hope this helps!

Lily Anne Garcia 1C
Posts: 80
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:55 pm

Re: Textbook question E.1

Postby Lily Anne Garcia 1C » Thu Oct 08, 2020 5:14 pm

Im not positive that this is correct, but if I were to approach this problem I would multiply 6.022x10^23 by twice the length of the radius. I believe that would give the length of the nanotube. Hope I could help.

Caelin Brenninkmeijer 1G
Posts: 85
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:50 pm

Re: Textbook question E.1

Postby Caelin Brenninkmeijer 1G » Thu Oct 08, 2020 5:18 pm

Hey! I was struggling with this problem a bit too.
First I converted the given amount of moles (1.00mol Ag) to atoms since the problem is asking for the creation of fibers one atom wide.
Multiply 144pm by two because they give you the radius and you need the diameter (=288p^2m).
Next, multiply the number of atoms by the diameter.
Convert the previous answer to meters (1pm=1x10^-12) and then convert once more to km (1km=1000m). The final answer should be 1.73x10^11 km.
Hope this helps!

Caelin Brenninkmeijer 1G
Posts: 85
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:50 pm

Re: Textbook question E.1

Postby Caelin Brenninkmeijer 1G » Thu Oct 08, 2020 5:23 pm

I only converted the answer to km because the textbook's final answer was in km.
Does anyone know why we're supposed to? I initially was going to leave it in m.

Eliana Carney 3E
Posts: 91
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:31 pm

Re: Textbook question E.1

Postby Eliana Carney 3E » Fri Oct 09, 2020 5:53 pm

Hey!

The first step to completing this problem is finding the number of silver atoms in 1.00 mol Ag because you need to know how many atoms you are connecting. This is a simple conversion using Avogadro's number (the number of atoms/molecules in one mole of a substance). All you do is multiply 1.00 mol Ag by 6.0221 x 10^23 (Avogadro's number), and you find that you have 6.0221 x 10^23 atoms Ag.

Next, you find the length of the fibers connecting all these atoms together. To do this, you first multiply 144 pm (the radius of one atom) by 2 to get the diameter of an atom. When you do this, you find that the dimeter of a singular atom is 288 pm. Then, you multiply 6.0221 x 10^23 atoms Ag by 288 pm, and you find that the length of the fibers connecting 1.00 mol Ag atoms together is 1.73 x 10^26 pm long.

Hope this helps!

Connie Liang 3L
Posts: 59
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:00 pm
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Textbook question E.1

Postby Connie Liang 3L » Sat Oct 10, 2020 12:29 pm

@Caelin, I believe the only reason the textbook converted the final answer to km was because the answer is a very large length. It should be fine if you keep it in m as long as it's converted correctly/the correct number.


Return to “Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest