Fundamentals E

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CenCen
Posts: 29
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Fundamentals E

Postby CenCen » Sat Nov 28, 2015 11:37 am

Fundamentals E3: In a nanotechnology lab you might have the capability to manipulate individual atoms. The atoms on the left are gallium atoms (molar mass 70 g/mol), those on the right are atoms of astatine (molar mass 210 g/mol). How many astatine atoms would have to be added to the pan on the right for the masses on the two pans to be equal?

Can you explain a way to approach this problem?

Andrea Sandri 3D
Posts: 21
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Fundamentals E

Postby Andrea Sandri 3D » Sat Nov 28, 2015 11:47 am

The question is referring to the diagram below the text of the question. Since you know that an astatine atom is three times as massive as a gallium atom, you know that you need three times as many gallium atoms as astatine atoms for the masses on the two pans to be equal. The number of gallium atoms is given as nine based on the diagram, so to find the number of astatine atoms for the masses on the two pans to be equal you just need to divide the number of gallium atoms (nine) by three.

CenCen
Posts: 29
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Fundamentals E

Postby CenCen » Sat Nov 28, 2015 11:58 am

So the diagram was necessary for this question? could I still solve this if the diagram were not there? And how?

Andrea Sandri 3D
Posts: 21
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Fundamentals E

Postby Andrea Sandri 3D » Fri Dec 04, 2015 10:58 am

Yes, the diagram is necessary for this question. If you didn't have the diagram or a textual description of how many astatine and gallium atoms are on either side of the scale, you would not be able to answer the question.


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