Photoelectric Effect and its light intensity  [ENDORSED]

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Rebecca Chu 1C
Posts: 27
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:02 am

Photoelectric Effect and its light intensity

Postby Rebecca Chu 1C » Sun Apr 15, 2018 9:57 pm

Why doesn't the photoelectric effect work in with high intensity light? Why must it be a light source with a long wavelength? What does a long wavelength do to the electrons that a short wavelength can't do in the photoelectric effect?

Eduardo R 1L
Posts: 8
Joined: Mon Apr 09, 2018 1:38 pm

Re: Photoelectric Effect and its light intensity

Postby Eduardo R 1L » Sun Apr 15, 2018 10:09 pm

The photoelectric effect works better with shorter wavelengths. Because the energy per photon E=hv depends on the frequency for a higher value, that means that a shorter wave length (c/lambda) gives you a higher frequency, which gives you higher energy that is needed to eject an e-.

Emely Reyna 1F
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:04 am

Re: Photoelectric Effect and its light intensity  [ENDORSED]

Postby Emely Reyna 1F » Sun Apr 15, 2018 10:11 pm

In order for electrons to be ejected, the energy of the photon must be the same as or greater than the work function or threshold energy. The only way to increase the energy of the photon to be able to eject electrons is to increase the frequency of the incoming photon. This results in a shorter wavelength because frequency and wavelength are inversely proportional. Therefore, shorter wavelengths have more energy than longer wavelengths and are able to eject electrons.


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