Diffraction meaning

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ZachMoore1C
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Diffraction meaning

Postby ZachMoore1C » Wed Apr 18, 2018 2:21 pm

What is the use if knowing a wave is diffracting either constructively or destructively?

Chem_Mod
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Re: Diffraction meaning

Postby Chem_Mod » Wed Apr 18, 2018 3:14 pm

Diffraction is a combination of destructive and constructive interference that leads to specific patterns based on what is causing diffraction. It can be used to determine atomic structures of crystals.

madisonhanson1b
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Re: Diffraction meaning

Postby madisonhanson1b » Wed Apr 18, 2018 4:25 pm

Constructive diffraction is when the peaks and troughs of the waves line up, the other diffraction is when the peaks and troughs of the waves do not line up and then essentially cancel each other out (in really basic terms)

Zuri Smith 1A
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Re: Diffraction meaning

Postby Zuri Smith 1A » Wed Apr 18, 2018 9:06 pm

I think of constructive diffraction as adding the magnitudes of 2 overlapping wavelengths of different sizes, and destructive diffraction would then be a subtraction of 2 overlapping, alternating wavelengths of different sizes (I don't know if this is actually true but I hope that it is!)

Anthony Mercado 1K
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Re: Diffraction meaning

Postby Anthony Mercado 1K » Thu Apr 19, 2018 6:54 pm

Are there any cases as to which a wave would be acting neither constructively or destructively, in some other alternate format?

AnthonyDis1A
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Re: Diffraction meaning

Postby AnthonyDis1A » Sun Apr 22, 2018 8:30 am

"Constructive" and "destructive" describe wave properties in the context of wave interference. They are used in a specific instance.

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Re: Diffraction meaning

Postby Chem_Mod » Sun Apr 22, 2018 3:25 pm

Dr. Lavelle went over the cases of "constructive" and "destructive" interference where the two waves were completely in phase or out-of-phase with each other, leading to either a bigger wave or a destruction of the amplitude. There can be cases where waves' amplitudes add up while some parts of the waves get destroyed. It all has to do with the phase of the waves.


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