Emission vs Absorption

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Aj1156
Posts: 34
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:22 am

Emission vs Absorption

Postby Aj1156 » Thu Oct 11, 2018 8:04 pm

When an atom absorbs a specific wavelength does that mean that an electron moves from a higher energy state to ground state

or is it that when an atom absorbs a specific wavelength they move from ground state to a higher energy state?

Angela Grant 1D
Posts: 67
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: Emission vs Absorption

Postby Angela Grant 1D » Thu Oct 11, 2018 8:12 pm

When an atom absorbs a photon, the energy from the photon sends the electron to a higher energy level. The electron emits energy in the form of light when it returns to its ground state.

Albert Duong 4C
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Re: Emission vs Absorption

Postby Albert Duong 4C » Thu Oct 11, 2018 8:13 pm

When an atom absorbs a specific wavelength or light, they're gaining energy so if there's enough energy, an electron will jump to a higher energy state.

Chem_Mod
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Re: Emission vs Absorption

Postby Chem_Mod » Thu Oct 11, 2018 8:15 pm

When an atom absorbs a specific wavelength of light, the electron is excited from ground state to a higher energy level because of that increase in energy. However, the electron falls back to its ground state and releases that energy in the process. This energy is released as light. At lower energy levels, the electron has more "negative" potential energy.

Alyssa Wilson 2A
Posts: 65
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: Emission vs Absorption

Postby Alyssa Wilson 2A » Thu Oct 11, 2018 8:19 pm

Albert Duong 1B wrote:When an atom absorbs a specific wavelength or light, they're gaining energy so if there's enough energy, an electron will jump to a higher energy state.

I agree, whereas light sources with shorter wavelengths(higher frequencies), can eject electrons even with low intensity light. One photon interacts with one electron, and low frequency light doesn't have enough photons with sufficient energy to eject an electron so it will just remain on that specific energy level.


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