Wavelength Properties

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katietietsworth_3c
Posts: 31
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:24 am

Wavelength Properties

Postby katietietsworth_3c » Fri Oct 12, 2018 2:20 pm

When solving if a certain object has wavelike properties I'm confused why numbers with less than 10^-18 do not show wavelength properties. Can someone explain what this threshold means and what the boundaries of a wavelike property are.

sonalivij
Posts: 70
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

Re: Wavelength Properties

Postby sonalivij » Sat Oct 13, 2018 12:52 am

Objects larger than that typically don't have wavelike properties because their momentum and mass are far too large.

804991762_4A
Posts: 47
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:04 am

Re: Wavelength Properties

Postby 804991762_4A » Sat Oct 13, 2018 1:05 am

In lecture the example of the car not having measurable wavelike properties (1.64 x 10^-38m ), Lavelle said that this number (10^-38) is very small therefore doesn’t show wavelike properties. I'm not sure though, someone correct me if I’m wrong.

Bianca Barcelo 4I
Posts: 74
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:17 am
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Wavelength Properties

Postby Bianca Barcelo 4I » Sat Oct 13, 2018 6:30 pm

sonalivij wrote:Objects larger than that typically don't have wavelike properties because their momentum and mass are far too large.



Also to elaborate, from the lecture, "All matter has wavelike properties but only noticed for moving objects with extremely small mass (like e-)"

Rehan Chinoy 1K
Posts: 67
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: Wavelength Properties

Postby Rehan Chinoy 1K » Sun Oct 14, 2018 6:09 pm

Yes, I believe all matter exhibits wavelike properties, but with our current techniques for measuring these wavelike properties we can only measure it for objects with relatively small mass and momentum, hence the 10^-15 (m) or 10^-18 (m) threshold.


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