energy transitions

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Divya Pimparkar 1E
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:19 am

energy transitions

Postby Divya Pimparkar 1E » Fri Oct 12, 2018 8:48 pm

How do electron transitions affect the atom?

Saleha_Mian_3E
Posts: 32
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: energy transitions

Postby Saleha_Mian_3E » Sat Oct 13, 2018 1:24 pm

The electron transitions excite the atoms and they give off photons with a particular energy, as he said in class.

KatrinaPho_2I
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Re: energy transitions

Postby KatrinaPho_2I » Sat Oct 13, 2018 2:53 pm

When electrons transition from one energy level to another, energy is released as photons of light. But the type of light is dependent on which energy level the electrons drops to. For example, when electrons drop to the first energy level, it releases UV light.

Samantha Chung 4I
Posts: 77
Joined: Wed Oct 03, 2018 12:16 am

Re: energy transitions

Postby Samantha Chung 4I » Sat Oct 13, 2018 3:45 pm

Electron transitions basically means that an electron goes from one energy level to another, in the process giving off energy as a photon of light. In high school I learned that as the n levels approahces infinity, the electron is infinitely far away from the nucleus, therefore experiencing weak forces of electrostatic attraction, and hence, the electron is able to be removed from the atom. This is called the ionization energy. Actually, I am very curious to find out how this "affects" the atom as well!
Last edited by Samantha Chung 4I on Sat Oct 13, 2018 8:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Alan Chang
Posts: 33
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:29 am

Re: energy transitions

Postby Alan Chang » Sat Oct 13, 2018 3:47 pm

When an electron transfers from a lower energy level to a higher energy level, energy is absorbed and the atom becomes less stable.

ThomascnguyenDis1J
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:16 am

Re: energy transitions

Postby ThomascnguyenDis1J » Sun Oct 14, 2018 8:36 pm

Could the orbital angular momentum quantum number be simply described as the number of electrons on an atom's orbital shell? If not, could someone describe it in greater detail?

Kyleigh Follis 2H
Posts: 64
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am
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Re: energy transitions

Postby Kyleigh Follis 2H » Sun Oct 14, 2018 9:35 pm

The orbital angular momentum quantum number (l) corresponds to the orbitals of a shell and the subshells, or group of orbital that have the sam value of l. For example, when n = 3, l can have any of the 3 values 0, 1, or 2. When l = 0, there is an s type of orbital. When l = 1, there is a p type of orbital. And when l = 2, there is a d type of orbital. The value of l also is used to measure the rate at which the electron circulates around the nucleus.


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