Atomic Spectrum: Lines in a Series

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Alli Hinmon 3E
Posts: 30
Joined: Wed Nov 08, 2017 3:00 am

Atomic Spectrum: Lines in a Series

Postby Alli Hinmon 3E » Sun Oct 14, 2018 8:24 pm

Hello,
In Chapter 1A I am having trouble conceptually understanding why it is important for us to memorize the different series's:
Lyman Series, Balmer series, and Paschen Series.
I understand that what they all have in common is that the lowest energy lever n1 is "common" to the lines within a series. But the book does not do a good job conceptually explaining why each series is important and when to use one series over another.
Thanks.

Atul Saha 3D
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: Atomic Spectrum: Lines in a Series

Postby Atul Saha 3D » Sun Oct 14, 2018 9:09 pm

Hey Alli,

The different series have different base energy levels. So only the Lyman series has the base energy level with quantum level n1. The Balmer series is at base energy level 2, etc. The series are probably important to know also in the context of their location on the EM spectrum differentiated by wavelength.

Much Joy,
Atul

ryanhon2H
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Re: Atomic Spectrum: Lines in a Series

Postby ryanhon2H » Sun Oct 14, 2018 9:31 pm

The different series correspond to different parts of the hydrogen spectrum. For example, the Balmer series is used for the visible light spectrum of hydrogen, while the Lyman series is used for the ultraviolet spectrum of hydrogen.

As Atul said, the series have different base energy levels. This is important to know for problems such as 1.15 in the 6th edition.

In the ultraviolet spectrum of atomic hydrogen, a line is
observed at 102.6 nm. Determine the values of n for the initial
and final energy levels of the electron during the emission of
energy that leads to this spectral line.

Since the problem talks about the ultraviolet spectrum, you know it is the Lyman series, where the base (initial) energy level is
n1 = 1, and then now all you have to do is to solve for the final energy level.


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