eV to J

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MaiaRodriguezChoi3E
Posts: 32
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

eV to J

Postby MaiaRodriguezChoi3E » Thu Oct 18, 2018 7:22 pm

Whats the conversion for eV to J? Should we memorize this conversion factor?

Samantha Chang 2K
Posts: 69
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:17 am

Re: eV to J

Postby Samantha Chang 2K » Thu Oct 18, 2018 7:31 pm

1eV= 1.6022 x 10^-19Joules

Saima Salam 3J
Posts: 32
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: eV to J

Postby Saima Salam 3J » Thu Oct 18, 2018 7:34 pm

1 eV = 1.6x10^-19 Joules. So if we are given a certain number of electron volt (eV) and want it in Joules, you would set up a conversion factor. For example, 2eV to Joules would be: 2eV x ((1.6 x 10^-19 J)/1 eV)) = 3.2 x 10^-19 J. I don't think we have to memorize it, he will probably give it to us on the test but I recommend memorizing it just to be on the safe side.

katie_sutton1B
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:17 am

Re: eV to J

Postby katie_sutton1B » Thu Oct 18, 2018 8:19 pm

So I get the conversion, but what exactly is an eV and what the difference between eV and J? Do they both measure energy?

Liza Hayrapetyan-3K
Posts: 31
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: eV to J

Postby Liza Hayrapetyan-3K » Thu Oct 18, 2018 10:39 pm

An eV is a unit of energy equal to approximately 1.602×10−19 joules (symbol J). One eV is equal to the amount of energy one electron acquires by accelerating through a potential difference of one volt.

Xinyi Zeng 4C
Posts: 63
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: eV to J

Postby Xinyi Zeng 4C » Thu Oct 18, 2018 11:43 pm

Just some relative information to help understand eV better and why it has such a value:
eV is the symbol for the electronvolt and it can also be written as electron-volt and electron volt. It is a unit of energy equal to approximately 1.6×10^-19 joules.
By definition, it is the amount of energy gained (or lost) by the charge of a single electron moving across an electric potential difference of one volt". That's why it has a value of one volt, 1 J/C, multiplied by the electron's elementary charge e, 1.6021766208(98)×10^-19 C, so one electronvolt is equal to 1.6021766208(98)×10−19 J!

Rosha Mamita 2H
Posts: 63
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:19 am

Re: eV to J

Postby Rosha Mamita 2H » Fri Oct 19, 2018 9:08 pm

The conversion seems to be on the equation sheet that's given to us on tests so we won't need to memorize the conversion

Chloe Likwong 2K
Posts: 70
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am

Re: eV to J

Postby Chloe Likwong 2K » Sun Oct 21, 2018 12:41 am

Just to verify the preceding comment, my TA said that the conversion will be listed on the test.


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