Atomic Spectra and Energy Levels

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Zoya Mulji 1K
Posts: 105
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:15 am

Atomic Spectra and Energy Levels

Postby Zoya Mulji 1K » Thu Oct 10, 2019 1:27 am

can someone elaborate on how spectroscopic analysis of light can be used to identify different elements?

Deepika Reddy 1A
Posts: 125
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Atomic Spectra and Energy Levels

Postby Deepika Reddy 1A » Thu Oct 10, 2019 8:06 am

Each element has its own unique emission spectrum. Each time the electrons in an atom absorb or emit light, it has to gain or lose an exact amount of energy to be able to jump up or down, and each jump has a specific wavelength of light. The emissions spectrum is made up of all the different jumps that the electrons in an atom can have, so each one is distinct for each element, as each element has a different number of protons and electrons. This causes unique light or wavelengths to be emitted, unique to the element.

Ally Huang- 1F
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Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Atomic Spectra and Energy Levels

Postby Ally Huang- 1F » Thu Oct 10, 2019 11:03 am

The spectra of light emitted is not continuous; atoms can only absorb and emit specific energy levels. When an atom emits light, it doesn't emit a smooth band of light, but many specific lines of light. These specific lines of light emitted are unique to only one element, which is how spectroscopy is used to identify elements. Element's emission spectra shows a line pattern unique to the energy levels associated with a specific element which allows an element to be identified.

karinaseth_1A
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Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Atomic Spectra and Energy Levels

Postby karinaseth_1A » Thu Oct 10, 2019 11:06 am

Going along with what was said above, light is also quantized, so it exists in discrete units. This is why you see jumps in energy levels and lines on an emission spectra—each element has a unique number of electrons with different sets of energy levels. These unique energy levels cause different elements' electrons to have different gaps with subshells.

Audrie Chan-3B
Posts: 50
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Atomic Spectra and Energy Levels

Postby Audrie Chan-3B » Thu Oct 10, 2019 12:51 pm

To elaborate, the specific lines that form as a result of an atom emitting light can be compared to a fingerprint that is unique to a certain atom. Therefore, each atom has a different identity when it comes to the lines that define them. I hope this makes sense

nickianel_4b
Posts: 50
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Atomic Spectra and Energy Levels

Postby nickianel_4b » Fri Oct 11, 2019 5:10 pm

There are specific frequencies shown in atomic spectra that are unique to each element. That is why each element is said to have a spectral fingerprint.


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