Intensity vs. Energy

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Mallika Singh 1G
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Intensity vs. Energy

Postby Mallika Singh 1G » Sun Oct 13, 2019 8:59 pm

What's the difference between the two concepts in terms of the photoelectric experiment?

Jonathan Gong 2H
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Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Intensity vs. Energy

Postby Jonathan Gong 2H » Sun Oct 13, 2019 9:27 pm

Intensity of light is measured as the rate at which energy is delivered to a unit of surface in terms of energy per unit time. EM energy is energy that is emitted from objects in the form of electrical and magnetic waves. Energy according to the equation E = hv, as well as c = lambda*v, depends on the frequency and the wavelength.

Kayli Choy 2F
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Re: Intensity vs. Energy

Postby Kayli Choy 2F » Tue Oct 15, 2019 10:15 am

During the photoelectric experiment, light was acting as a particle. When the intensity of light was increased, only the number of photons increased. However, each photon still did not have sufficient energy to eject an electron. When the frequency of the light was increased, the energy of each photon increased, and the photons had enough energy to eject the electrons.

Fatemah Yacoub 1F
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Re: Intensity vs. Energy

Postby Fatemah Yacoub 1F » Tue Oct 15, 2019 10:18 pm

In terms of a photoelectric experiment, the intensity is determined by the number of photons present. That's why increasing the intensity in a photoelectric experiment did not yield more electrons being ejected. Energy however is determined by frequency and the frequency has a minimum value depending on the metal.

Ashley Nguyen 2L
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Re: Intensity vs. Energy

Postby Ashley Nguyen 2L » Wed Oct 16, 2019 3:31 am

In the photoelectric experiment, light was acting as a particle known as a photon. Increasing the intensity of the light changed only the number of photons being used and nothing else. This is why increasing intensity did not affect the electrons being emitted. A single photon must have enough energy to cause an electron to be emitted from the metal surface, so increasing energy would change how the electron was emitted by increasing its kinetic energy. Changing the frequency of the light allows one to change the energy of the photon, which had a direct effect on the electron being emitted.

805394719
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Re: Intensity vs. Energy

Postby 805394719 » Wed Oct 16, 2019 7:22 am

The intensity of a wave is defined by the number of photons it contains. The energy of the wave, however, refers to its frequency as the energy of the photons only increases with an increase in frequency. For example, when the intensity of the wave was increased in the photoelectric experiment for light with high frequency, the number of photons interacting with the surface has increased, causing more electrons to be ejected because more photons hit the metal surface per unit time. At low frequencies, however, no electrons were ejected regardless of the intensity, meaning that increasing the intensity did not increase the energy of the photons, and the photons could not overcome the threshold energy. At high frequencies, even low-intensity light ejected electrons because the energy of the light was high.

Katie Bart 1I
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Re: Intensity vs. Energy

Postby Katie Bart 1I » Wed Oct 16, 2019 11:32 am

So does the number of photons have an effect on frequency? Or only intensity?

Alexis Webb 2B
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Re: Intensity vs. Energy

Postby Alexis Webb 2B » Wed Oct 16, 2019 11:32 am

The number of photons only has an effect on the intensity.

Ariel Davydov 1C
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Re: Intensity vs. Energy

Postby Ariel Davydov 1C » Wed Oct 16, 2019 1:29 pm

The intensity of a light source is directly related to the number of photons and the rate at which they are projected onto the sample. The frequency is not related to the number of photons or intensity.

Reina Robles 2B
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Re: Intensity vs. Energy

Postby Reina Robles 2B » Wed Oct 16, 2019 1:37 pm

In the photoelectric experiment, increasing the intensity would only increase the number of photons (like making a light brighter, for example). On the other hand, the researches needed to increase the energy of each individual photon. This is done by increasing the frequency of the EM wave.

cassidysong 1K
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Re: Intensity vs. Energy

Postby cassidysong 1K » Sat Oct 19, 2019 10:43 pm

intensity depends on the amplitude of the wavelength and is directly related to the amount of photons while energy is related to if there is enough energy for the electron to be ejected.


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