Work function/Threshold Energy

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Angel Gutierrez 2E
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Work function/Threshold Energy

Postby Angel Gutierrez 2E » Sat Oct 17, 2020 12:15 pm

I am confused on what the threshold energy means when talking about the photoelectric effect. I understand that the work function is the minimum amount of energy required to remove an electron from the metal. But are the threshold energy and the work function related in any way?

Thank you!

Rylee Mangan 1K
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Re: Work function/Threshold Energy

Postby Rylee Mangan 1K » Sat Oct 17, 2020 12:20 pm

The threshold energy is also known as the work function. Specifically, the work function is the minimum energy required to remove electrons from a specific surface whereas threshold energy is the minimum energy required to remove the electrons. Two names for two very similar things in the work we are doing for this class - finding the minimum energy frequency required to remove an electron!

Tessa House 3A
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Re: Work function/Threshold Energy

Postby Tessa House 3A » Sat Oct 17, 2020 12:32 pm

When talking about the photoelectric effect, the work function and threshold energy are essentially the same thing. The work function is the minimum energy required to remove an electron from a substance. The threshold energy is also the minimum energy required to remove an electron. The work function is what is given more often in problems, but I believe they are essentially the same.

Kyla Roche 2K
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Re: Work function/Threshold Energy

Postby Kyla Roche 2K » Sat Oct 17, 2020 12:37 pm

Yes the work function is the amount of energy needed to remove an electron and is basically the same thing as the threshold energy. The kinetic energy is the amount of energy the electron has after being ejected meaning that the energy in the photon surpasses the threshold energy.

Ven Chavez 2K
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Re: Work function/Threshold Energy

Postby Ven Chavez 2K » Sat Oct 17, 2020 1:40 pm

In regards to the photoelectric effect, threshold energy and the work function are interchangeable. They both refer to the minimum amount of energy required to remove electrons.

Norah Gidanian 3D
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Re: Work function/Threshold Energy

Postby Norah Gidanian 3D » Sat Oct 17, 2020 1:53 pm

Hi
The work function and threshold energy I believe are the same thing. It is just the minimum amount of energy required to remove an electron.

Catherine Bubser 2C
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Re: Work function/Threshold Energy

Postby Catherine Bubser 2C » Sat Oct 17, 2020 2:44 pm

On that note, does threshold energy refer to the amount of energy needed to move the electron in general or does it differ depending on the level level?

Keshav Patel 14B 2B
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Re: Work function/Threshold Energy

Postby Keshav Patel 14B 2B » Sat Oct 17, 2020 3:42 pm

Absolutely, work function and threshold energy are directly related. The work function is the amount of energy it takes to release an electron from a material, and the threshold energy is that amount of energy. Once the material passes that threshold of energy it immediately releases an electron.

Edwin Liang 1I
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Re: Work function/Threshold Energy

Postby Edwin Liang 1I » Sat Oct 17, 2020 4:59 pm

The threshold energy and the work function are the exact same, only with different names. In the photoelectric effect experiment, the threshold energy is the amount of energy required to displace an electron from the metal.

Jaden Joodi 3J
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Re: Work function/Threshold Energy

Postby Jaden Joodi 3J » Sat Oct 17, 2020 5:27 pm

Catherine Bubser 2C wrote:On that note, does threshold energy refer to the amount of energy needed to move the electron in general or does it differ depending on the level level?

All the threshold energy refers to is the energy required to dislocate an electron from an atom of any metal. If the energy of the photon was the exact same as the threshold energy, the electron would be dislocated with no velocity. I am not sure if you are referring to levels of electrons as being n=1, n=2, etc., but if so these levels should be the same for any given metal. This would be part of the reason that different metals have different threshold energies. Hope that made sense!

Ansh Patel 2I
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Re: Work function/Threshold Energy

Postby Ansh Patel 2I » Sat Oct 17, 2020 5:51 pm

Hi! The threshold energy and work function are the same thing in reference to the photoelectric effect, in that they represent the least amount of energy required to remove an electron. Both terms are used interchangeably.

Sreeram Kurada 3H
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Re: Work function/Threshold Energy

Postby Sreeram Kurada 3H » Sat Oct 17, 2020 5:55 pm

Yes they are the same thing. The work function is used to mathematically model the threshold energy.

Chudi Onyedika 3A
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Re: Work function/Threshold Energy

Postby Chudi Onyedika 3A » Sat Oct 17, 2020 10:27 pm

The Work Function and the Threshold Energy are the same. The word "work" in this instance refers to energy.

Joshua Chung 2D
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Re: Work function/Threshold Energy

Postby Joshua Chung 2D » Sun Oct 18, 2020 10:24 am

In the context of the Photoelectric effect, both are interchangeable. They both refer to the minimum amount of energy to remove one electron from the specified material.

ALee_1J
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Re: Work function/Threshold Energy

Postby ALee_1J » Sun Oct 18, 2020 10:29 am

They are equivalent terms. Work function = threshold energy = minimum amount of energy required to remove an electron.

Carolina Gomez 2G
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Re: Work function/Threshold Energy

Postby Carolina Gomez 2G » Sun Oct 18, 2020 5:35 pm

Yes, the work function and the threshold energy mean the same thing in regards to the photoelectric effect. It means the minimum amount of energy needed to eject the electron. This can be seen with the the equation: E(photon)-E(work function)=Ek. Electrons are emitted when the work function/ threshold energy is greater than or equal to the energy of the photon.

Taha 2D
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Re: Work function/Threshold Energy

Postby Taha 2D » Sun Oct 18, 2020 5:41 pm

They are the same thing and refer to the minimum energy required to excite an electron to the point it leaves the surface. Different substances have different values and if energy lower than the threshold is supplied nothing substantial will occur.

Joshua Swift
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Re: Work function/Threshold Energy

Postby Joshua Swift » Sun Oct 18, 2020 6:23 pm

In the photoelectric experiment, the threshold energy is the minimum amount of energy needed to remove an electron from the metal surface. Not overcoming this threshold results in an electron reaching its excited state, but not to the point where it can be removed.

Joshua Swift
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Re: Work function/Threshold Energy

Postby Joshua Swift » Sun Oct 18, 2020 6:23 pm

In the photoelectric experiment, the threshold energy is the minimum amount of energy needed to remove an electron from the metal surface. Not overcoming this threshold results in an electron reaching its excited state, but not to the point where it can be removed.

Gustavo_Chavez_1K
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Re: Work function/Threshold Energy

Postby Gustavo_Chavez_1K » Sun Oct 18, 2020 9:41 pm

The threshold function and work function are basically the samething. Professor Lavelle was using them almost interchangebly in lecture and I remember writing in my notes that in this scenario they essentially both signify the lowest amount of kinetic energy required to eject an electron.


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