Ionic Bonds of Octet Outliers

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Patrick Wilson 2B
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Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 3:00 pm

Ionic Bonds of Octet Outliers

Postby Patrick Wilson 2B » Fri Oct 14, 2016 2:22 pm

I know that Hydrogen is "happy" with two electrons and it doesn't follow the octet rule, but for the other three elements mentioned that are outliers, how many electrons do they look for to be more stable when bonding ionically?

Marc Farah 3D
Posts: 22
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:59 pm

Re: Ionic Bonds of Octet Outliers

Postby Marc Farah 3D » Fri Oct 14, 2016 2:45 pm

Unlike covalent bonding where they share their electrons, in ionic bonding, the elements with high electronegativty like Oxygen and Flourine pull the electrons from He, Li, Be. So oxygen for example would satisfy the octet rule becoming an anion while the metal would become a cation.

Hannah_Chao_1D
Posts: 25
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 3:00 pm

Re: Ionic Bonds of Octet Outliers

Postby Hannah_Chao_1D » Sun Oct 16, 2016 3:28 pm

He, Li, and Be follow the duet or duplet rule. They all want 2 electrons because the highest subshell they can have is ns^2 and the s orbital can only have 2 electrons.

Sophia Eliopulos 2I
Posts: 21
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:56 pm

Re: Ionic Bonds of Octet Outliers

Postby Sophia Eliopulos 2I » Mon Oct 17, 2016 9:54 am

Two exceptions to the octet rule are hydrogen and helium, which both have room for only two electrons in their valence shell. Because they both only have one shell, the first shell has only one s orbital and no p orbital, so it holds only two electrons (which is when helium and hydrogen are most stable). Another exception, Lithium (with three protons and electrons), is most stable when it gives up an electron. Other exceptions include boron and aluminum, which are very stable with only six valence electrons.


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