Covalent/ Ionic Bond

Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

torialmquist1F
Posts: 49
Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:00 am

Covalent/ Ionic Bond

Postby torialmquist1F » Fri Nov 03, 2017 11:08 am

How do we determine it two elements will form and ionic or covalent bond?

Lily Guo 1D
Posts: 64
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:03 am

Re: Covalent/ Ionic Bond

Postby Lily Guo 1D » Fri Nov 03, 2017 11:16 am

A metal and a non-metal will typically form an ionic bond, whereas non-metals bonding together will typically form a covalent bond!

Angelica Mercado 1A
Posts: 21
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am

Re: Covalent/ Ionic Bond

Postby Angelica Mercado 1A » Fri Nov 03, 2017 12:15 pm

A rough guideline to follow is that you can identify an ionic bond if the bonded elements have an electronegativity difference greater than 2. A covalent bond would typically have an electronegativity less than 1.5. Since electronegativity increases as you go left to right across a period then we can infer that elements on opposite ends of the periodic table, or a metal and a non-metal, will form an ionic bond. Elements close to each other on the periodic table (2 non-metals/ 2 metals) would form a covalent bond.

Clara Hu 1G
Posts: 50
Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:00 am
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Covalent/ Ionic Bond

Postby Clara Hu 1G » Fri Nov 03, 2017 1:23 pm

Common examples of molecules with covalent bonds are HI, HBr, and HCl, whereas salts like KCL, KF, and LiF have ionic bonds.

Sarah Spalding 3E
Posts: 10
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:06 am

Re: Covalent/ Ionic Bond

Postby Sarah Spalding 3E » Fri Nov 03, 2017 4:12 pm

Also keep in mind that sometimes it can be difficult to determine which is which--there is a portion of bonds "in between" covalent and ionic bonds (due to differing, but still similar, attraction to electrons). In these cases, these bonds can (but don't always) exhibit behaviors of both.

Mika Sonnleitner 1A
Posts: 50
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am
Been upvoted: 2 times

Re: Covalent/ Ionic Bond

Postby Mika Sonnleitner 1A » Fri Nov 03, 2017 4:53 pm

Additionally, ionic bonds are salts that dissociate in water; this is because their electrons and transferred instead of shared (as is the case with covalent bonds), so they compound is much easier to break up/dissolve. In contrast, covalent bonds are molecules that do not easily dissolve in water; since their electrons are shared, it is much more difficult to break apart the compound.


Return to “Ionic & Covalent Bonds”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest