Ionic or Covalent?

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JasonNovik3A
Posts: 21
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am

Ionic or Covalent?

Postby JasonNovik3A » Fri Nov 03, 2017 11:45 pm

How do I find out whether a bond is covalent or ionic, and whether it's polar or non-polar?
For example, NaCl or CH4?

Lena Nguyen 2H
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Re: Ionic or Covalent?

Postby Lena Nguyen 2H » Fri Nov 03, 2017 11:55 pm

Ionic or covalent bonds are decided by the differences in electronegativity. Bonds have partial ionic and covalent character, but if the the difference in electronegativity is greater than 2, it is considered ionic. If the difference is less than 1.4, it is considered covalent.

If the charges between atoms is unequal (an electron is attracted to one atom more than the other), they will have partial charges that make the bonds polar.

Sabrina Fardeheb 2B
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Re: Ionic or Covalent?

Postby Sabrina Fardeheb 2B » Sat Nov 04, 2017 12:02 am

You can tell if a bond is ionic and covalent by calculating their electronegativity.
- A bond is ionic if the electronegativity difference is > 2
- A bond is covalent if the electronegativity is < 1.5
- If the electronegativity difference is between 1.5 and 2, then it will vary what the bond is.

You can tell if a bond is polar or nonpolar by looking at how the electrons are distributed.
- A bond is polar if the electrons are not equally shared and there's an increasing difference in electronegativity.
- A bond is nonpolar if the electrons are not equally shared.

Irma Ramos 2I
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Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am

Re: Ionic or Covalent?

Postby Irma Ramos 2I » Sat Nov 04, 2017 11:15 am

Is there any way to tell if a bond is ionic or covalent without having to calculate the electronegativity difference?

Hazem Nasef 1I
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Joined: Tue Oct 10, 2017 7:13 am

Re: Ionic or Covalent?

Postby Hazem Nasef 1I » Sat Nov 04, 2017 2:36 pm

Yes, you can look at the distance between the two elements on the periodic table. For example, sodium and chlorine are on opposite sides of the periodic table, so you can know that the electronegativity difference will be quite large and an ionic bond will form. As opposed to nitrogen and oxygen, which are very close to each other on the periodic table, so the electronegativity difference will be small and the bond will be covalent.

For elements that are moderately distant from each other, generally you can't be completely sure unless you check the exact values.


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