Ionic and Covalent Bonds

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Nancy Le - 1F
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Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am

Ionic and Covalent Bonds

Postby Nancy Le - 1F » Sat Nov 04, 2017 3:37 pm

What are the main differences between ionic and covalent bonds?

Deborah Cheng 1F
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Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2017 3:00 am

Re: Ionic and Covalent Bonds

Postby Deborah Cheng 1F » Sat Nov 04, 2017 3:39 pm

Ionic bonds join two ions, covalent bonds join two nonmetal atoms. If the electronegativity difference is >2 then it is considered an ionic bond, if electronegativity difference is <1.5 then it is considered a covalent bond.
Last edited by Deborah Cheng 1F on Mon Nov 13, 2017 8:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Clarisse Wikstrom 1H
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Re: Ionic and Covalent Bonds

Postby Clarisse Wikstrom 1H » Sat Nov 04, 2017 4:42 pm

Deborah Cheng 3K wrote:Ionic bonds join two nonmetal atoms, covalent bonds join two ions. If the electronegativity difference is >2 then it is considered an ionic bond, if electronegativity difference is <1.5 then it is considered a covalent bond.


This first part of this answer is a bit mixed up: ionic bonds join ions (think of it like one atom steals the e- of the other) whereas covalent bonds join nonmetals through the sharing of e-.

ConnorThomas2E
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Re: Ionic and Covalent Bonds

Postby ConnorThomas2E » Sat Nov 04, 2017 7:48 pm

The best way to tell is that the electro negativity is <1.5 for covalent bonds and is >2 for ionic bonds. It is also important to realize that some ionic bonds have covalent bond characteristics, and some covalent bonds have ionic bond characteristics. This depends on the extent of attraction of an electron to the atom.

JonathanLam1G
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Re: Ionic and Covalent Bonds

Postby JonathanLam1G » Mon Nov 06, 2017 5:03 pm

I've always held the notion that ionic bonds were stronger than covalent bonds (it takes more [heat] energy to melt salt than it does to melt ice), but the Sunday review session (3 - 4 pm) the TA mentioned that ionic bonds are weaker in water. My question is as follows: given a question "Order the bonds in order of strongest to weakest: ionic, covalent, _____. _____" would ionic be stronger or weaker than covalent?

AtreyiMitra2L
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Re: Ionic and Covalent Bonds

Postby AtreyiMitra2L » Tue Nov 07, 2017 11:52 am

Ionic bonds have a very high difference in electronegativities. They tend to occur between a metal and a nonmetal as metals (metals have low electronegativities and nonmetals have high electronegativities). Covalent bonds, by comparison, have a low difference in electronegativity. They tend to occur between 2 nonmetals. Ionic bonds are very soluble in water because of the cation and anion inside. They also are brittle with high melting points. They have a much higher bond strength than covalent bonds. Covalent bonds aren't soluble in water and tend to have low melting points.

Cali Rauk1D
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Re: Ionic and Covalent Bonds

Postby Cali Rauk1D » Tue Nov 07, 2017 12:32 pm

I am not quite sure what the "correcting ionic model" means because it says all ionic bonds have some covalent character. How is that true?

Josh Moy 1H
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Re: Ionic and Covalent Bonds

Postby Josh Moy 1H » Tue Nov 07, 2017 6:41 pm

Ionic bonds are btween a metal and non metal, and a covalent bond is between two non metals

Peter Dis1G
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Re: Ionic and Covalent Bonds

Postby Peter Dis1G » Wed Nov 08, 2017 1:21 pm

Ionic bonds are usually metals+nonmentals. NaCl,NaF,LiF are good examples. Covalent bonds are usually two nonmetals. CH4,H2O and CO2 are good examples.

Raymond Zhang 3H
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Re: Ionic and Covalent Bonds

Postby Raymond Zhang 3H » Wed Nov 08, 2017 1:48 pm

Ionic bonds have one atom "donating" an electron to another atom. This creates an anion and a cation that are held together by electronegativity, by how their differing charges attract, a relatively weak bond. This also causes them to usually form crystalline structures and be soluble in water, creating a conducting solution.


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