the Octet rule

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Peter Nguyen 2I
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:29 am

the Octet rule

Postby Peter Nguyen 2I » Sun Oct 28, 2018 4:24 pm

When forming bonds, do atoms always try to follow the octet rule? Are there exceptions to this rule/guideline?

timothy_ho_4B
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:29 am

Re: the Octet rule

Postby timothy_ho_4B » Sun Oct 28, 2018 4:28 pm

As far as I know, most atoms should follow the octet rule. There are a few atoms (mostly unstable ones) that bond in
very odd formations, but I'm sure we will go over them in class or they won't be important for the course.

RandallNeeDis3K
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: the Octet rule

Postby RandallNeeDis3K » Sun Oct 28, 2018 4:30 pm

Yes they always look for the full octet.

Rhea Churi 4K
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Re: the Octet rule

Postby Rhea Churi 4K » Sun Oct 28, 2018 4:36 pm

Usually, most atoms try to follow the octet rule. However, there are cases where 1) molecules have an odd number of electrons
(ex. NO), 2) two few valence electrons result in an incomplete octet usually common w boron, aluminum, and beryllium (ex. BH3), or 3) expanded octets - molecules possess more than eight valence electrons (ex. SF6).

Daniel Lai
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Re: the Octet rule

Postby Daniel Lai » Sun Oct 28, 2018 4:55 pm

Most elements try to go for a full octet or a half-filled octet.

Jessica Castro 2H
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Re: the Octet rule

Postby Jessica Castro 2H » Sun Oct 28, 2018 5:31 pm

Most elements try to follow the Octet Rule in order to obtain a more stable state. However, as Dr. Lavelle mentioned during lecture, Hydrogen, Helium, Lithium, and Beryllium are exceptions to the Octet Rule because they don't have enough electrons in which obtaining 8 valence electrons would make them more stable (instead, they jump down to 2 valence electrons).

alanaarchbold
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

Re: the Octet rule

Postby alanaarchbold » Sun Oct 28, 2018 5:34 pm

Wait what does hydrogen do in that situation?? Can you explain that better please

Esha Harwalkar 3F
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:26 am

Re: the Octet rule

Postby Esha Harwalkar 3F » Sun Oct 28, 2018 5:36 pm

Hydrogen only holds 1 electron in the outermost shell (only 1 valence electron), so if drawing a lewis dot structure, it will only have a single bond to another atom and no more dots around it.

shaunajava2e
Posts: 66
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:26 am

Re: the Octet rule

Postby shaunajava2e » Sun Oct 28, 2018 5:52 pm

all elements follow the octet rule except hydrogen, helium, lithium, and beryllium which have a max of 2 valance electrons

Srikar_Ramshetty 1K
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Re: the Octet rule

Postby Srikar_Ramshetty 1K » Sun Oct 28, 2018 6:23 pm

Most atoms do abide by the octet rule, however, there are exceptions. Hydrogen and Helium are examples of atoms that do not since they do not require are fine with having only 2 electrons. There are also examples of atoms having more than 8 electrons, such as sulfur in SF6, this is known as an expanded octet and is not a common feature in a molecule.

Hope this helps!

Pritish Patil 1K
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:24 am

Re: the Octet rule

Postby Pritish Patil 1K » Sun Oct 28, 2018 7:44 pm

Elements usually abide by the octet rule or want a half octet.

405021651
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Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2017 3:03 am

Re: the Octet rule

Postby 405021651 » Sun Oct 28, 2018 8:31 pm

A half octet also makes a stable atom?

Yiting_Gong_4L
Posts: 69
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: the Octet rule

Postby Yiting_Gong_4L » Sun Oct 28, 2018 9:12 pm

I think that the octet or the half octet is the most stable.

Nick Bazett 1F
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:15 am

Re: the Octet rule

Postby Nick Bazett 1F » Sun Oct 28, 2018 9:16 pm

Hydrogen becomes a cation when it loses its electron to become stable.

Alan Chang
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:29 am

Re: the Octet rule

Postby Alan Chang » Sun Oct 28, 2018 9:27 pm

Most follow the octet rule, but there are exceptions. For example there are the ones Dr. Lavelle mentioned in the lecture, and the expanded octet (I don't know if we will learn about this though).

Isabelle_Maletz_3E
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Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:03 am

Re: the Octet rule

Postby Isabelle_Maletz_3E » Sun Oct 28, 2018 9:53 pm

The octet rule, which states in covalent bonds the atoms share electrons until a noble gas configuration is reached, is applied to most atoms when drawing a Lewis dot structure. However H, He, Li, and Be are all exceptions in that they do not have to form an octet because they do not have enough valence electrons to do so.

Rebecca Park
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:17 am

Re: the Octet rule

Postby Rebecca Park » Sun Oct 28, 2018 10:00 pm

Most of them follow the rules, but I know that Boron is an exception to it even though it only has 6 valence electrons.

Avery Zuelch 1D
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: the Octet rule

Postby Avery Zuelch 1D » Sun Oct 28, 2018 10:11 pm

Yes they always follow the octet rule! Except for hydrogen. That only gets two electrons

Luis_Yepez_1F
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: the Octet rule

Postby Luis_Yepez_1F » Sun Oct 28, 2018 10:19 pm

The only exception to the octet rule are the first four elements, as they will try to only finish the first shell which only needs two e-.

Danny Elias Dis 1E
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:19 am

Re: the Octet rule

Postby Danny Elias Dis 1E » Sun Oct 28, 2018 11:23 pm

No, there are exceptions. For example, a hydrogen atom has only 1 electron, therefore the maximum number of electrons it can have is two (to fill the orbital).

davidryan3f
Posts: 63
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am

Re: the Octet rule

Postby davidryan3f » Sun Oct 28, 2018 11:26 pm

yes, there are a few exceptions. These exceptions are hydrogen, helium, lithium, beryllium. These atoms don't need to fulfill the octet rule.

Arshia Ramesh 1G
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: the Octet rule

Postby Arshia Ramesh 1G » Sun Oct 28, 2018 11:43 pm

Are H, He, Li, Be the only four that are exceptions?


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