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Ionic vs Covalent Bonds

Posted: Thu Nov 01, 2018 10:03 pm
by Ricardo Martin 1J
What is the difference between ionic and covalent bonds?

Re: Ionic vs Covalent Bonds

Posted: Thu Nov 01, 2018 10:13 pm
by Ryan Danis 1J
In ionic bonds, metals and non metals either gain or lose electrons to achieve the electron configuration of the nearest noble gas. Thus, the transfer of electrons leads to an octet of electrons (although there is an exception for H, He, Li, and Be).

Main group metals form cations. They lose s and p valence electrons to achieve the electron configuration of the preceding noble gas.

p-block non metals form anions. They gain p valence electrons to achieve the electron configuration of the following noble gas.

In covalent bonds, non metals share electrons to form covalent bonds; their ionization energies are too high to form ionic bonds.

Re: Ionic vs Covalent Bonds

Posted: Fri Nov 02, 2018 12:59 am
by yaosamantha4F
Ionic bonds are usually formed between a metal and a nonmetal; the metal loses electrons are transferred to the nonmetal so that both atoms can have the same electron configuration as the preceding/following noble gas.

Covalent bonds, on the other hand, involve electrons being shared between atoms to achieve an octet. These are usually between non-metals.

Re: Ionic vs Covalent Bonds

Posted: Fri Nov 02, 2018 8:45 am
by sarahartzell1k
Ionic bonds involve the transfer of electrons while in covalent bonds the electron is shared

Re: Ionic vs Covalent Bonds

Posted: Fri Nov 02, 2018 11:44 pm
by 204765696
These two opposite ions attract each other and form the ionic bond. Covalent bonding is a form of chemical bonding between two non metallic atoms which is characterized by the sharing of pairs of electrons between atoms and other covalent bonds

Re: Ionic vs Covalent Bonds

Posted: Sat Nov 03, 2018 8:22 pm
by Arlene Linares 3A
Ryan Danis 1K wrote:In ionic bonds, metals and non metals either gain or lose electrons to achieve the electron configuration of the nearest noble gas. Thus, the transfer of electrons leads to an octet of electrons (although there is an exception for H, He, Li, and Be).

Main group metals form cations. They lose s and p valence electrons to achieve the electron configuration of the preceding noble gas.

p-block non metals form anions. They gain p valence electrons to achieve the electron configuration of the following noble gas.

In covalent bonds, non metals share electrons to form covalent bonds; their ionization energies are too high to form ionic bonds.



Thank you I understand the difference. :)

Re: Ionic vs Covalent Bonds

Posted: Sat Nov 03, 2018 8:31 pm
by Brian Kwak 1D
I just had a question. For Ionic and Covalent bonds would it be specifically one or would it be more accurate to say its one a spectrum? For example a Bond would have more ionic properties than covalent?

Re: Ionic vs Covalent Bonds

Posted: Mon Nov 05, 2018 1:19 pm
by Brian Chang 2H
404975660 wrote:I just had a question. For Ionic and Covalent bonds would it be specifically one or would it be more accurate to say its one a spectrum? For example a Bond would have more ionic properties than covalent?


Bonding is a spectrum where ionic is "giving" and covalent is "sharing" and depending on the electronegativity of the two bonding nuclei.

As a rough guideline:

If the difference in electronegativity between the two elements is >2 the bond should be ionic.

If the difference in electronegativity between the two elements is <1.5 the bond should be covalent.

Goodluck!

Re: Ionic vs Covalent Bonds

Posted: Thu Nov 08, 2018 12:38 pm
by Stevin1H
Covalent bonds are associated with the sharing of electrons between two nonmetals while Ionic bonds involve the transfer of electrons between a metal and nonmetal, which involves lattice energy. Ionic bonds are extremely stronger than covalent bonds because of the smaller distance between Ionic bonds versus covalent bonds The shorter the bond distance, the more energy required to break the bond.

Re: Ionic vs Covalent Bonds

Posted: Thu Nov 08, 2018 6:25 pm
by Jennifer Lathrop 1F
The book states that most bonds are somewhere in between purely covalent and purely ionic. When depicting these bonds, how does one know when to depict a bond as ionic or covalent when it is in this in between state?

Re: Ionic vs Covalent Bonds

Posted: Thu Nov 08, 2018 6:28 pm
by Angela Grant 1D
Jennifer Lathrop 3E wrote:The book states that most bonds are somewhere in between purely covalent and purely ionic. When depicting these bonds, how does one know when to depict a bond as ionic or covalent when it is in this in between state?


The book uses a rough guideline in which a difference in electronegativity greater than 2 is an ionic bond, and less than 1.5 is covalent.

Re: Ionic vs Covalent Bonds

Posted: Thu Nov 08, 2018 7:06 pm
by Mallory_Podosin_1H
Stevin1H wrote:Covalent bonds are associated with the sharing of electrons between two nonmetals while Ionic bonds involve the transfer of electrons between a metal and nonmetal, which involves lattice energy. Ionic bonds are extremely stronger than covalent bonds because of the smaller distance between Ionic bonds versus covalent bonds The shorter the bond distance, the more energy required to break the bond.


Why are ionic bonds so much stronger than covalent bonds - is it simply because of distance? Could there be a strong covalent bond that is stronger than a weak ionic bond or is an ionic bond always stronger than covalent bond? I'm pretty sure that I spent all of high school thinking that covalent bonds were stronger so now I need to wrap my head around the truth!!

Re: Ionic vs Covalent Bonds

Posted: Thu Nov 08, 2018 9:02 pm
by Yukta Italia 3I
Mallory_Podosin_1H wrote:
Stevin1H wrote:Covalent bonds are associated with the sharing of electrons between two nonmetals while Ionic bonds involve the transfer of electrons between a metal and nonmetal, which involves lattice energy. Ionic bonds are extremely stronger than covalent bonds because of the smaller distance between Ionic bonds versus covalent bonds The shorter the bond distance, the more energy required to break the bond.


Why are ionic bonds so much stronger than covalent bonds - is it simply because of distance? Could there be a strong covalent bond that is stronger than a weak ionic bond or is an ionic bond always stronger than covalent bond? I'm pretty sure that I spent all of high school thinking that covalent bonds were stronger so now I need to wrap my head around the truth!!


I think I understand where your confusion is coming from because I had the same question. In my biology class I learned that covalent bonds are stronger than ionic bonds, but this concept applies to ionic bonds in water specifically because they are able to dissolve easily (e.g. NaCl). For the context of Chem 14a, ionic bonds are stronger than covalent bonds because we aren't referring to these bonds in a cellular/aqueous environment.

Re: Ionic vs Covalent Bonds

Posted: Thu Nov 08, 2018 9:15 pm
by Daniel Chang 3I
Ionic Bonds usually consist of a non-metal and metal that transfer electrons while a covalent bond is between non-metals that share electrons

Re: Ionic vs Covalent Bonds

Posted: Fri Nov 09, 2018 1:55 pm
by Megan_Ervin_1F
Also, on this topic, do ionic bonds also have dispersion forces?

Re: Ionic vs Covalent Bonds

Posted: Fri Nov 09, 2018 1:57 pm
by Lydia Luong 4L
Ionic--> transfer of electrons, covalent--> sharing of electrons

Re: Ionic vs Covalent Bonds

Posted: Fri Nov 09, 2018 4:58 pm
by Karla_Ocampo 4E
Hi! So there are two types of atomic bonds, ionic and covalent. A covalent bond is two non metals bonding together. An example of a covalent bond is water (H2O). An ionic bond is when a cation (metal) bonds with a anion (nonmetal). An example of an ionic bond is NaCl. I hope this helped!

Re: Ionic vs Covalent Bonds

Posted: Sat Nov 10, 2018 9:32 pm
by Nick Bazett 1F
How do you determine which compounds have bonds with greater ionic character?

Re: Ionic vs Covalent Bonds

Posted: Sat Nov 10, 2018 9:37 pm
by I am Sodium Funny
Ionic: gives up electrons, based on electrostatic attraction
Covalent: Shared electrons between atoms