Ionic vs covalent

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Gwynneth Orlino 1B
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Ionic vs covalent

Postby Gwynneth Orlino 1B » Mon Jul 29, 2019 1:44 pm

How can I determine if a compound has ionic or covalent bonds?

Jennifer Zhou 1A
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Re: Ionic vs covalent

Postby Jennifer Zhou 1A » Mon Jul 29, 2019 2:47 pm

if the electronegativity difference is greater than 2, it has ionic bond
if the electronegativity difference is less than 1.5, it has covalent bond

Chris Charton 1B
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Re: Ionic vs covalent

Postby Chris Charton 1B » Mon Jul 29, 2019 11:28 pm

If the difference is between 1.5 and 2 does the bond exhibit qualities of both ionic and covalent bonds?

Yasmin Olvera 1D
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Re: Ionic vs covalent

Postby Yasmin Olvera 1D » Tue Jul 30, 2019 12:12 pm

Jennifer Zhou 1A wrote:if the electronegativity difference is greater than 2, it has ionic bond
if the electronegativity difference is less than 1.5, it has covalent bond


How would we go about calculating electronegativity?

Chem_Mod
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Re: Ionic vs covalent

Postby Chem_Mod » Tue Jul 30, 2019 12:33 pm

You determine if a compound has ionic or covalent bonds by examining the electronegativity differences between atoms. You will not need to do calculations for electronegativity. If the electronegativity difference between two atoms is greater than 2, then an ionic bond will form (ex. salts like NaCl). If the electronegativity difference is less than 1.5, then a covalent bond will form. Polar covalent bonds are bonds between elements with different electronegativites but those that aren't large enough that we would call the bond ionic. Therefore, electronegativity differences between 1.5 and 2 can be thought of as polar covalent bonds.

Jennifer Zhou 1A
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Re: Ionic vs covalent

Postby Jennifer Zhou 1A » Tue Jul 30, 2019 2:50 pm

Yasmin Olvera 1D wrote:
Jennifer Zhou 1A wrote:if the electronegativity difference is greater than 2, it has ionic bond
if the electronegativity difference is less than 1.5, it has covalent bond


How would we go about calculating electronegativity?


there is an electronegativity chart if you google it, but we don't have to memorize all of them. but I think we should know that F is the most electronegative, the trend of electronegativity ( more electronegative towards the top right corner of the periodic table), metal usually form ionic bond with non-metal, etc.

Alex Hitti 3E
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Re: Ionic vs covalent

Postby Alex Hitti 3E » Wed Oct 23, 2019 2:11 pm

In a simpler observation (not including any calculations), ionic bonds are bonds between a metal and nonmetal where electrons are donated/transferred. Meanwhile, covalent bonds are bonds between 2 non-metals where electrons are shared. Ionic bonds also tend to have a high boiling point and a large polarity. Covalent bonds tend to have lower boiling points and when they do have polarity it is relatively small.

Astrid Lunde 1I
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Re: Ionic vs covalent

Postby Astrid Lunde 1I » Wed Oct 23, 2019 4:09 pm

An ionic bond is the transfer of electrons from a metal to a non metal atom.
A covalent bond is the sharing of electrons of non metals.

annikaying
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Re: Ionic vs covalent

Postby annikaying » Wed Oct 23, 2019 4:20 pm

You can look at the electronegativity difference to determine if the bond is ionic or covalent but typically you can just go off of whether or not the two atoms are both nonmetal (which gives a covalent bond) or if they are a nonmetal with a metal (which gives an ionic bond).


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