Boiling Point

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duenezjuleny1D
Posts: 48
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:24 am

Boiling Point

Postby duenezjuleny1D » Wed Jul 31, 2019 2:10 am

how can you determine if something has a higher or lower boiling point than the other?

Karina Vasquez 1D
Posts: 35
Joined: Fri Mar 01, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Boiling Point

Postby Karina Vasquez 1D » Wed Jul 31, 2019 2:17 am

A way I determine a higher boiling point is by figuring out if there is a hydrogen bond in the molecule because hydrogen bonds tend to have higher boiling points.

Ethan McCarthy 1F
Posts: 31
Joined: Wed Feb 27, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Boiling Point

Postby Ethan McCarthy 1F » Wed Jul 31, 2019 8:01 am

Strength and type of intermolecular forces (ion-ion, ion-dipole, dipole-dipole, dipole-induced dipole, induced dipole-induced dipole), as well as the shape of the molecule (rod-shaped [allows for dipoles to be closer together] vs. spherical) affects the boiling point. The stronger the intermolecular force means the more energy (heat) will be required to overcome the intermolecular forces, resulting in higher boiling points.

haileyramsey-1c
Posts: 54
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Boiling Point

Postby haileyramsey-1c » Mon Oct 21, 2019 12:47 pm

Ionic bonds typically have the highest boiling points due to their charges. Then, as mentioned, hydrogen bonds create very high boiling points. This is because it requires the greatest amount of energy to break the intermolecular bonds. Dipole-dipole bonds have a lower boiling point compared to hydrogen bonds and ionic bonds, but their higher boiling point is due to electronegativity difference between atoms. Finally is dispersion forces which have lowest boiling point of the four because these are instantaneous dipoles.

Parsamokhtar
Posts: 55
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Boiling Point

Postby Parsamokhtar » Mon Oct 21, 2019 12:50 pm

For this, you would probably have to see which has a stronger type of intermolecular bonds, the stronger the bond between molecules, the more energy would be required to sever them, which would lead that molecule/compound to have a higher boiling point.


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