ionization

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Cassandra_1K
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Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:16 am

ionization

Postby Cassandra_1K » Fri Oct 25, 2019 1:27 am

Why is the second ionization energy of an element always higher??

Cassandra_1K
Posts: 49
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:16 am

Re: ionization

Postby Cassandra_1K » Fri Oct 25, 2019 1:29 am

And How does ionization energy vary across a period in an overall way?

Mashkinadze_1D
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Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:15 am

Re: ionization

Postby Mashkinadze_1D » Fri Oct 25, 2019 1:29 am

This is due to the face that the effective nuclear charge will now play a much higher effect on the electrons. The electrons will have less shielding and therefore the connection to the nucleus will be greater and therefore we would need to add more energy to remove an electron than when shielding was present.

Cassandra_1K
Posts: 49
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:16 am

Re: ionization

Postby Cassandra_1K » Fri Oct 25, 2019 1:29 am

And How does ionization energy vary across a period in an overall way?

Mashkinadze_1D
Posts: 87
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:15 am

Re: ionization

Postby Mashkinadze_1D » Fri Oct 25, 2019 1:32 am

To the second question, in general, the ionization energy will decrease as we go down the periodic table due to a greater effect of shielding and therefore less done by the nucleus to keep the electrons bound. The ionization energy will increase as we go across the rows of the periodic table from left to right because as we go across the nucleus keeps getting larger and therefore has more of an effect on the electrons that are related to it. Noble gases have the highest ionization energies because it would not make sense for them to lose electrons as they are in their most stable configuration.

Siya Shah 1J
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:15 am

Re: ionization

Postby Siya Shah 1J » Fri Oct 25, 2019 8:43 am

Cassandra_1K wrote:Why is the second ionization energy of an element always higher??


Ionization energy is the energy required to remove an electron from an atoms. The second ionization energy is the energy required to remove an electron from a cation with a +1 charge. In this cation, there is already one more proton than there are electrons, therefore the effective nuclear charge is much higher. Removing the second electron requires much more energy than removing the first one because the nucleus pulls in the valence electrons in much more tightly after the first ionization.

Karina Kong 2H
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Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:16 am

Re: ionization

Postby Karina Kong 2H » Sat Oct 26, 2019 12:30 pm

The second ionization energy is always higher because when you remove the first e-, it becomes a cation which is positively charged. That positive charge is then more attracted to the negative charge of the electron, making it harder to pull a second electron away.

Drake Choi_1I
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:15 am

Re: ionization

Postby Drake Choi_1I » Sat Oct 26, 2019 1:45 pm

Removing the first electron results in a positive charge. This charge has more attraction to the electron, thus making removing the second electron more difficult.

Jillian C 4C
Posts: 51
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:16 am

Re: ionization

Postby Jillian C 4C » Sat Oct 26, 2019 5:30 pm

There is less shielding and more protons after the first electron is removed. Therefore, more nuclear charge makes it more difficult for the next electron to be removed and will thus make the ionization energy higher.


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