2A.23 question

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Aashka Popat 1A
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Joined: Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:16 am

2A.23 question

Postby Aashka Popat 1A » Sun Oct 27, 2019 10:40 pm

This is the question: On the basis of the expected charges on the monatomic ions, give the chemical formula of each of the following compounds: (a) magnesium arsenide; (b) indium(III) sulfide; (c) aluminum hydride; (d) hydrogen telluride; (e) bismuth(III) fluoride.

I don't know how to approach this problem, could anyone explain how to find the formula of part a? Thanks!

Ashley Kao 1H
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Re: 2A.23 question

Postby Ashley Kao 1H » Sun Oct 27, 2019 10:45 pm

I believe the chemical formula for Magnesium Arsenide is Mg3As2.

Andrew Pfeiffer 2E
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Joined: Sat Sep 28, 2019 12:16 am

Re: 2A.23 question

Postby Andrew Pfeiffer 2E » Sun Oct 27, 2019 10:48 pm

Magnesium arsenide: As2Mg3

Indium III Sulfide: In2S3

Aluminum hydride: AlH3

Aluminum telluride: H2Te

Bismuth III Flouride: BiF3

Eesha Chattopadhyay 2K
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Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:16 am

Re: 2A.23 question

Postby Eesha Chattopadhyay 2K » Sun Oct 27, 2019 10:50 pm

In order to find the equation you have to look at the charges for magnesium ions and for arsenic ions. Magnesium ions have a charge of 2+ and arsenic ions have a charge of 3- so in order to balance the charges there must be three magnesium atoms and 2 arsenic atoms.

Andrew Pfeiffer 2E
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Joined: Sat Sep 28, 2019 12:16 am

Re: 2A.23 question

Postby Andrew Pfeiffer 2E » Sun Oct 27, 2019 10:52 pm

For a further explanation of part A, Magnesium usually gives up 2 valence electrons, while Arsenic usually takes 3 valence electrons. Thus, two Arsenic atoms would take 6 valence electrons, and 3 Magnesium atoms would give 6 valence electrons.

Maya Beal Dis 1D
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Re: 2A.23 question

Postby Maya Beal Dis 1D » Mon Oct 28, 2019 10:56 am

This question asks you to determine the empirical formula of the ionic compound that would be formed if these two elements were to form an ionic bond. To do this you should find each element on the periodic table and determine the charge that element usually assumes based on it's valence electrons. Then you must have a net charge of zero between the atoms in the ionic bond, so you multiply each atom by the amount that is needed to balance the charges.


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