Polarity

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Diana A 2L
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:16 am
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Polarity

Postby Diana A 2L » Sun Oct 27, 2019 11:57 pm

Are covalent bonds polar or nonpolar? And is there a relation between electronegativity and polarity? I partially forgot my high school chemistry and don't exactly remember what electronegavity is a measure of.

Alice Chang 2H
Posts: 101
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Polarity

Postby Alice Chang 2H » Mon Oct 28, 2019 12:00 am

Found out through a Google search that covalent bonds can be both polar and nonpolar!
Nonpolar covalent bonds are a type of chemical bond where two atoms share a pair of electrons with each other. Polar covalent bonding is a type of chemical bond where a pair of electrons is unequally shared between two atoms.

Ryan Yee 1J
Posts: 101
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Polarity

Postby Ryan Yee 1J » Mon Oct 28, 2019 12:07 am

Polarity just depends on the electronegativity difference between two bonding atoms, and dipole moments are created when the electronegativity difference between two bonding atoms is greater on one side of the molecule than the other.

For example, CCl4 is nonpolar because all the bonds dipole moments cancel each other out.
H2O is polar because of the unbonded pair of electrons at the top of oxygen, causing for a bent shape in the molecule and for the dipole moments to form a net vector away from oxygen's lone pair.

Ashley Fang 2G
Posts: 102
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Polarity

Postby Ashley Fang 2G » Mon Oct 28, 2019 12:09 am

Yes!
An example of a polar covalent bond would be water (H2O), where most of the negative charge is from the oxygen on one side of the molecule and the positive charge of the hydrogen atoms is on the other side of the molecule.
An example of a nonpolar covalent bond would be carbon dioxide (CO2), where both oxygen atoms pull on carbon's electrons equally, thus the electrons are shared equally.

Rohit Ghosh 4F
Posts: 99
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Polarity

Postby Rohit Ghosh 4F » Tue Oct 29, 2019 2:49 pm

You can use the Pauling scale to determine polarity as well.

Joseph Saba
Posts: 154
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Polarity

Postby Joseph Saba » Tue Oct 29, 2019 2:53 pm

A general rule to use when figuring out if a molecule is polar or not is to look at the symmetry. VSEPR theory goes into more detail about specific structures that aren't symmetric or that are symmetric.

erica thompson 4I
Posts: 55
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:21 am

Re: Polarity

Postby erica thompson 4I » Thu Oct 31, 2019 12:41 am

Depends on the specific molecule and how much "pull" each element has in it.


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