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Ionization of Nitrogen vs Oxygen

Posted: Fri Nov 08, 2019 12:32 pm
by vanessas0123
Why is the ionization energy of nitrogen higher than that of oxygen's? Doesn't IE increase from left to right on the periodic table?

Re: Ionization of Nitrogen vs Oxygen

Posted: Fri Nov 08, 2019 12:34 pm
by Kaitlyn Ang 1J
You're correct in that IE increases from left to right, but Nitrogen has a higher IE because it has a half-filled p subshell which is more stable than Oxygen's 4 e- p subshell, so it actually requires more energy to take away that electron from Nitrogen than Oxygen

Re: Ionization of Nitrogen vs Oxygen

Posted: Fri Nov 08, 2019 12:37 pm
by Justin Quan 4I
To explain this break in the periodic trend, we need to take a look at the electron configuration of nitrogen and oxygen. The electron configuration of nitrogen is 1s2 2s2 2p3, which means it has a stable, half-filled 2p shell. Oxygen's electron configuration is 1s2 2s2 2p4, one electron beyond stable in the 2p shell. So taking an electron from nitrogen would make it less stable, that's why nitrogen has a higher ionization energy than oxygen.

Re: Ionization of Nitrogen vs Oxygen

Posted: Fri Nov 08, 2019 2:05 pm
by kpang_4H
Oxygen has a 4th electron which makes a pair in the orbital which has more electron repulsion due to that paired electron, giving it a lower ionization energy.

Re: Ionization of Nitrogen vs Oxygen

Posted: Fri Nov 08, 2019 5:58 pm
by Simon Dionson 4I
The orbitals of oxygen have one more electron in any of the p orbitals. These create electron-electron repulsions that make it easier to remove an electron than nitrogen.

Re: Ionization of Nitrogen vs Oxygen

Posted: Sat Nov 09, 2019 10:13 am
by Kaitlyn Jang 1F
Ionization energy does increase going left to right across a periodic table. However, comparing the electronic configuration of nitrogen and oxygen, you can see that nitrogen ends at 2p3 and oxygen is 2p4. Half or fully filled orbitals are stable, and nitrogen's 2p orbital is filled halfway so it is more stable than oxygen, meaning it would require more energy to remove an electron from nitrogen than oxygen.

Re: Ionization of Nitrogen vs Oxygen

Posted: Sun Nov 10, 2019 5:54 pm
by Amy Kumar 1I
The half-filled orbitals for nitrogen and more stable and harder to remove an electron from than the 1 orbital in oxygen that has 2 paired electrons.

Re: Ionization of Nitrogen vs Oxygen

Posted: Sun Nov 10, 2019 6:17 pm
by 504939134
Due to Nitrogen’s half filled orbitals, it makes it more stable and more difficult to remove and electron as opposed to oxygen which has two paired electrons.

Re: Ionization of Nitrogen vs Oxygen

Posted: Tue Nov 12, 2019 10:22 am
by Mitchell Koss 4G
Ionization energy does not follow the trend in this case, but electronegativity does.

Re: Ionization of Nitrogen vs Oxygen

Posted: Tue Nov 12, 2019 12:30 pm
by Mariah
Is this the only case that doesn't follow the ionization trend?

Re: Ionization of Nitrogen vs Oxygen

Posted: Tue Nov 12, 2019 12:33 pm
by Rita Chen 1B
I was wondering whether this goes for the ones below as well. I was a little confused whether these exceptions are for all of the ones that follow the same atom trend.

Re: Ionization of Nitrogen vs Oxygen

Posted: Wed Nov 13, 2019 12:50 pm
by 805317518
Rita Chen 1C wrote:I was wondering whether this goes for the ones below as well. I was a little confused whether these exceptions are for all of the ones that follow the same atom trend.


This doesn't apply to the ones below, hence why it's an exception to the general IE trend.
Possible explanation: In the other atoms, there are more electrons, including within the d-orbital, that would help to stabilize the atom. In other words, since there's more electrons, the difference of one electron would be less likely to destabilize the atom and have a large ionization energy jump between electrons within the same orbital. I hope that makes sense.