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hydrogen

Posted: Sat Dec 07, 2019 12:45 pm
by 905174774
FOr hydrogen bonds, it can be with any molecule or only with, F,O,N atoms to be considered a chemical bonds?

Re: hydrogen

Posted: Sat Dec 07, 2019 12:47 pm
by AVerma_F19
The hydrogen in question must be bound to a Nitrogen, Oxygen or Fluorine. This is so that the electron density is almost completely pulled away from the hydrogen, essentially having it become an exposed proton that can bind to any lone pairs. The lone pairs, however, can come from any atom (typically also an N, O, or F).

Re: hydrogen

Posted: Sat Dec 07, 2019 3:00 pm
by Jesse Anderson-Ramirez 3I
The Hydrogen must be bound to an F, O, or N.

Re: hydrogen

Posted: Sun Oct 25, 2020 6:25 pm
by rita_debbaneh2G
Hydrogen bonding is when a hydrogen atom bonded to a much more electronegative atom (essentially F, O, or N) forms an attraction to an H atom bonded to another such electronegative atom. The ability for these H atoms to form an attraction to other H atoms relies on polarity resulting from bonding with the F, O, or N, so if an H atom is bonded to any random molecule, the H bonding wouldn't be possible because the polarity might not be strong enough for this to occur.

Re: hydrogen

Posted: Sun Oct 25, 2020 10:43 pm
by joshtully
Hydrogen bounds are only found on oxygen, fluorine, and nitrogen.

Re: hydrogen

Posted: Sun Oct 25, 2020 11:01 pm
by Maryeli Garay 2H
The Hydrogen has to bond with F N or O, because they are more electronegative than H.

Re: hydrogen

Posted: Fri Oct 30, 2020 8:34 am
by Jiapeng Han 1C
For hydrogen bond, H atom must be bonded to a very electronegative atom such as N, O, or F so that the only electron of hydrogen atom is nearly completely pulled over to the lone pair electronegative atom.

Re: hydrogen

Posted: Sun Nov 01, 2020 2:14 pm
by Heidi Buri 2I
Hydrogen bonding can occur when a hydrogen binds to either fluorine, oxygen or nitrogen. This only occurs with these three elements due to their electronegative properties. Fluorine, Oxygen, and Nitrogen are all very electronegative, so when they bing to hydrogen bonds there are partial negative and positive poles that allow the hydrogen bonds to occur.

Re: hydrogen

Posted: Sun Nov 01, 2020 5:15 pm
by Brian_Wu_3B
N, O, and F are super electronegative because they have minimal shielding (due to having less electrons) and they are really close to their octet. Hydrogen, having only one proton, can't hold onto its single electron as well, so the N, O , and F essentially hog them.

Re: hydrogen

Posted: Sun Nov 01, 2020 5:32 pm
by AlbertGu_2C
Hydrogen bonds are only able to be established on those 3 elements due to how electronegative they are relative to Hydrogen

Re: hydrogen

Posted: Sun Nov 01, 2020 9:13 pm
by David Liu 1E
N, O, and F have the strongest attraction to a hydrogen because they are all really close to their octet, and it was mentioned that in most of the time we would see hydrogen primarily bind to these elements

Re: hydrogen

Posted: Sun Nov 01, 2020 9:13 pm
by Aliya Roserie 3I
N,F,O are typically the ones we see forming hydrogen bonds.

Re: hydrogen

Posted: Sun Nov 01, 2020 9:15 pm
by Katie Nye 2F
A hydrogen bond is only possible between hydrogen and either fluorine, oxygen, or nitrogen. I always remember this by "a hydrogen bond can only be formed by a Freak Of Nature (FON)"

Re: hydrogen

Posted: Sun Nov 01, 2020 9:24 pm
by Ethan Goode 2H
It is typically F, O, or N in a hydrogen bond. The key to hydrogen bonds is that the hydrogen has a partial positive charge due to its low electronegativity, which is able to bond with the partial negative of another atom due to its high electronegativity.

Re: hydrogen

Posted: Sun Nov 01, 2020 9:27 pm
by Adrienne Chan 1G
The only requirements for hydrogen bonds are that the hydrogen in one molecule must have a slight positive charge and F, O, or N must have a slight negative charge. Hydrogen bonds are not "true bonds" as they form between different molecules.

Re: hydrogen

Posted: Sun Nov 01, 2020 9:29 pm
by Jack Kettering 3D
For there to be a hydrogen bond the hydrogen must be bonded to either Nitrogen, Oxygen, or Fluorine :)

Re: hydrogen

Posted: Sun Nov 01, 2020 9:44 pm
by Danielle Goldwirth 3F
Yes, the hydrogen must be bonded to an O, N, or F atom because these atoms are highly electronegative which will result in a polar molecule in which the H atoms can have a partial positive charge that will allow them to bond to the partial negative charges on the other F, O, or N atoms of another molecule.

You may come across an H atom that is bonded to a Carbon atom, and you must know that this CANNOT form a hydrogen bond with itself (the same molecule) because H and C have similar electronegativities and thus the H will not have a partial positive charge to be able to bond to an electronegative atom.

Re: hydrogen

Posted: Sun Nov 01, 2020 11:54 pm
by Jarrett Sung 3B
Hydrogen bonds only occur with O, N, and F because of their high electronegativities that interact with the low electronegativity of the H. This results in the partial positive charge on the H interacting with the partial negative of another atom.

Re: hydrogen

Posted: Sun Nov 01, 2020 11:59 pm
by Teti Omilana 1G
Hydrogen bonds only occur with N, O, or F because they have to be bonded to a highly electronegative atom. Nitrogen, Oxygen, and Fluorine are the only atoms with a high enough electronegativity for this to occur!

Re: hydrogen

Posted: Mon Nov 02, 2020 8:21 am
by Aria Movassaghi 1A
Hydrogen has to be bonded with Nitrogen, Oxygen, or Fluorine.