Valence Electrons

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004643111
Posts: 14
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Valence Electrons

Postby 004643111 » Fri Oct 09, 2015 1:39 pm

How do you find the number of valence electrons an element has? I understand that generally, you can correlate the number of valence electrons with the group number it is in, however I believe that this rule does not apply to transition metals. How are you able to determine transition metals' valence electrons?

Richmund Tan 1L
Posts: 25
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Valence Electrons

Postby Richmund Tan 1L » Fri Oct 09, 2015 2:58 pm

I believe that normally you would need to "backwards solve" if you are given a polyatomic ion or molecule and you know the final charge. Even elements like carbon and nitrogen may have different charges than +4 and -3 respectively. In general, group 3 has a +3 charge and group 12 has a +2 charge. Everything else varies depending on the molecule, at least from my understanding.

Sophia Xu 3F
Posts: 21
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Valence Electrons

Postby Sophia Xu 3F » Sun Oct 18, 2015 7:16 pm

Valence electrons are the electrons in the outest shell.

Omar Habib 3L
Posts: 21
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Valence Electrons

Postby Omar Habib 3L » Sun Oct 18, 2015 8:56 pm

Valence electrons are considered in the outermost shell.

For example: For an element like Scandium, the ground-state electron configuration would be [Ar] 3d1 4s2.

Thus, the only electrons that are considered valence electrons here are the ones part of the 4s orbital, since it's on the outermost shell. There would be 2 paired valence electrons.


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