Sampling 28

Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

jessicasilverstein1F
Posts: 122
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:57 pm

Sampling 28

Postby jessicasilverstein1F » Sat Oct 31, 2020 11:38 am

Does anyone know how to determine the l value based off the n value?

ALee_1J
Posts: 110
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:32 pm

Re: Sampling 28

Postby ALee_1J » Sat Oct 31, 2020 11:39 am

I think you'd have to look at the periodic table too. Like n=1 only has the s-orbital, n=2 only has the s and p orbital, and then n=3 has s and p and d orbital, etc. If I remember correctly, l = (n-1), like the highest possible l.

Q Scarborough 1b
Posts: 111
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:59 pm
Been upvoted: 2 times

Re: Sampling 28

Postby Q Scarborough 1b » Sat Oct 31, 2020 11:58 am

The value of l can be 0,1,2,3,...,(n-1). With 0 corresponding to the s-orbital, 1 with the p-orbital, 2 with the d-orbital, and so on.

Minahil_Tufail_3I
Posts: 90
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:00 pm

Re: Sampling 28

Postby Minahil_Tufail_3I » Sat Oct 31, 2020 12:06 pm

The value of l always takes on values starting from 0 and ending to whatever the value of n-1 is. For example, if n = 3, then l = 0, 1, 2, because 3-1 = 2, meaning this is the highest value l can be.

Rajshree 1F
Posts: 101
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:32 pm

Re: Sampling 28

Postby Rajshree 1F » Sun Nov 01, 2020 9:20 am

based on the n, you can know what l (orbitals) are possible. for example n = 3 means l values can be 0, 1, and (n=1) aka 2. l = 0 is the s-orbital. l=1 is the p orbital. l=2 is the d orbital. depending on which element in the level you are working with, you can deduce which l value it has based on where it is on the periodic table groups. hope that helps!

Sameer Chowdhury 3C
Posts: 92
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:41 pm

Re: Sampling 28

Postby Sameer Chowdhury 3C » Sun Nov 01, 2020 1:50 pm

I believe in most of the sapling problems we're given both a number/letter, for example 4s. This provides you with the information for both the n an l values. N being simply the number. And the letter tells you the l value. When it is s l=0, p l=1, d l=2, f l=3 and so on.

David Liu 1E
Posts: 90
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:07 pm

Re: Sampling 28

Postby David Liu 1E » Sun Nov 01, 2020 9:21 pm

the max l value is always one less than the n value, and you can tell what it's in by the orbital that's stated. s=0, p=1, d=2, f=3 and so on

Rylee Mangan 1K
Posts: 92
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:40 pm
Been upvoted: 2 times

Re: Sampling 28

Postby Rylee Mangan 1K » Sun Nov 01, 2020 9:24 pm

The value of N(shell) is specified by the coefficient in the orbital designation. The value of L(the subshell) is one less than n (n-1)! Value of ml(orbital number) is a range of values based on L(so -L,0,L). And ms is either -1/2 or 1/2 depending on the spin of the electron. Hope this helps!

Morgan Gee 3B
Posts: 90
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:48 pm

Re: Sampling 28

Postby Morgan Gee 3B » Sun Nov 01, 2020 11:12 pm

The l value cannot be determined solely from the n value as there is simply not enough information. However, the n value provides the possible ranges for the l value. The minimum value is always 0 and the maximum value is always n - 1. The different subshells will provide you with the information necessary in order to determine the n value. s subshell is 0. p subshell is 1. d subshell is 2. p subshell is 3. Of course this is how you can determine impossible quantum numbers as 1p will never exist. n = 1 and l = 1 but max value of l is n-1

Carolina Gomez 2G
Posts: 90
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:32 pm

Re: Sampling 28

Postby Carolina Gomez 2G » Sun Nov 01, 2020 11:19 pm

The l value can be 0,1,2,3... n-1. If n=3, then the l value could be 0, 1, or 2. If n=1, then the l value could only be 0 because it can only be up to n-1. The l value therefore can range from 0 to n-1. l represents the orbital so l=0 is a s orbital, l=1 is a p orbital, and l=2 is a d orbital.

Eve Gross-Sable 1B
Posts: 92
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:02 pm
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Sampling 28

Postby Eve Gross-Sable 1B » Sun Nov 01, 2020 11:26 pm

There will be multiple l values for an n value unless the letter of the orbital is specified, unless it's n=1 because there is only one subshell. FOr example if all you're given is that n=2, l could be 0 or 1 depending on the subshell letter. Hope that helps!


Return to “Ionic & Covalent Bonds”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest