Different Bonds

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Lily Mohtashami
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:34 pm

Different Bonds

Postby Lily Mohtashami » Sun Nov 01, 2020 5:51 pm

Can someone explain the difference in depth between an ionic and a covalent bond?

Samantha Pedersen 2K
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Re: Different Bonds

Postby Samantha Pedersen 2K » Sun Nov 01, 2020 6:00 pm

Ionic bonds are formed when electrons are transferred from a metal atom to a nonmetal atom whereas covalent bonds are formed when electrons are shared between atoms. Substances with ionic bonds form crystals whereas substances with covalent bonds form molecules. Finally, substances with ionic bonds typically dissociate into ions when they are placed in water whereas substances with covalent bonds are typically less soluble in water. I hope this helps!

Evie Li_1H
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Re: Different Bonds

Postby Evie Li_1H » Sun Nov 01, 2020 6:02 pm

Ionic bonds are formed between two ions (1 positive and 1 negative) where the electron is completely given up to the negative ion. For example, in Na+ and Cl-, there is an ionic bond formed where Cl gains one of the electrons from Na. Atoms always want to be more stable, meaning they want their valence subshell completely filled (the same number of electrons as the noble gases in column 18). When Na gives up on electron and Cl gains one electron, they both have the same number of electrons as Ar (argon) in the noble gas column and they are happy and stable. Ionic bonds are also stronger than covalent bonds.

Covalent bonds are when the electrons are shared. In H2, for example, they both want to have the same number of electrons as helium (to fill their subshell) and they do so by sharing each other's electron. The electron doesn't completely go to either hydrogen atom. They each have one electron, but when they form a covalent bond, the electron is shared so they pretty much have two electrons, which makes them happy and stable.

Hope this helps :)

Aayushi Jani 3A
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Re: Different Bonds

Postby Aayushi Jani 3A » Sun Nov 01, 2020 7:45 pm

Ionic bonds form between a metal and a nonmetal atom (an example from the lecture: KCl, potassium chloride). In an ionic bond, the electron transfer results in an an octet of electrons for each atom. The cations lose electrons and the anions gain electrons. In covalent bonds, however, cations cannot be formed from the non-metals as their ionization energies are too high. As a result, they share electrons to form covalent bonds (instead of transferring the electrons). An example is of F2, where the two fluorine atoms share two electrons so that they each form an octet.

Adrienne Chan 1G
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Re: Different Bonds

Postby Adrienne Chan 1G » Sun Nov 01, 2020 11:09 pm

An ionic bond has one atom completely "stealing" the electron of the other, there is a complete transfer. Covalent bonds still share electrons between the atoms, but one atom might steal the electron more often (resulting in a partial negative/positive charge on the respective atoms).

Morgan Gee 3B
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Re: Different Bonds

Postby Morgan Gee 3B » Sun Nov 01, 2020 11:15 pm

Ionic bonds occur when there is a very large electronegativity between two atoms. Typically this occurs between a nonmetal and a metal, with a common example being NaCl. In these cases, the electron from Na (less electronegative) is transferred to Cl (very electronegative), creating an ionic bond. Covalent bonds occur when there is a small electronegativity between two atoms. Typically this occurs between two nonmetals with examples being O2 and CO2. Covalent bonds can be further classified into nonpolar covalent and polar covalent bonds. In nonpolar covalent bonds, the electronegativity is similar enough that electrons are shared equally as is the case with O2. In polar covalent bonds, the electronegativity is large enough that electrons are shared unequally as is the case with H2O, where H develops a partial positive charge (less electronegative) and O develops a partial negative charge (more electronegative).

Nicoli Peiris 1B
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Re: Different Bonds

Postby Nicoli Peiris 1B » Mon Nov 02, 2020 12:19 pm

I like to think of iconic bonds as being between a metal and a nonmetal and a covalent bond as being between two nonmetals. I believe it was mentioned in lecture that ionic bond happens when two elements far away in the periodic table come together and that a covalent bond happens when two elements close in the periodic table come together.

YUNALEE
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Re: Different Bonds

Postby YUNALEE » Wed Nov 04, 2020 3:58 pm

Covalent bond is sharing electrons and ionic is transferring electrons

Liam Bertrand 3
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Re: Different Bonds

Postby Liam Bertrand 3 » Wed Nov 04, 2020 4:31 pm

Adding on, covalent bonds are between two nonmetals, while ionic bonds are one metal and a nonmetal.


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