Temporary vs Permanent Dipole Moments

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Mahnoor_Wani_1I
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Temporary vs Permanent Dipole Moments

Postby Mahnoor_Wani_1I » Mon Nov 09, 2020 1:01 pm

What is the difference between temporary and permanent dipole moments? How are they both formed?

Ria Nawathe 1C
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Re: Temporary vs Permanent Dipole Moments

Postby Ria Nawathe 1C » Mon Nov 09, 2020 1:07 pm

An example of a molecule with a permanent dipole is H2O; the difference in electronegativity between the O and Hs causes the electrons to be pulled towards O, creating a permanent delta negative and delta positive side. Temporary dipoles occur when molecules that are otherwise non-polar, like N2, collide with other molecules in a way that shifts their electron densities and fleetingly causes a delta negative and delta positive side. The electron densities aren't permanently distorted, they return to their normal, non-polar state.

Samuel Flores 1E
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Re: Temporary vs Permanent Dipole Moments

Postby Samuel Flores 1E » Mon Nov 09, 2020 1:09 pm

Hello! So a permanent dipole comes in the the form of a polar covalent bond, where the two involved atoms unequally share their electrons (different electronegativities.
On the other hand, a temporary dipole arises from the fluctuation of electron density in a covalent bond. If at one point the electron density is fluctuating toward one atom, then this forms a temporary dipole that can change with electron distribution.

Hope this helps!


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