covalent character

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Ai-nhi Tran 3A
Posts: 20
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

covalent character

Postby Ai-nhi Tran 3A » Fri Dec 04, 2015 10:55 pm

What determines which compound has bonds that have the most or the least covalent character?
i.e. which of the compounds below has bonds with the least covalent character?
AgI AgCl AgF AlCl3 BeCl2

Emilyreynolds3k
Posts: 20
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: covalent character

Postby Emilyreynolds3k » Fri Dec 04, 2015 11:24 pm

The degree of covalent character is determined by the difference in electronegativity between the two atoms. The greater the difference, the more ionic it is, and in turn, the less covalent it is. You can figure which molecules have greater differences in electronegativity by using the elecronegativity trends on the periodic table.

KaitlynWatkins2D
Posts: 10
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: covalent character

Postby KaitlynWatkins2D » Sat Dec 05, 2015 3:24 pm

This problem is in the 2013 Final (question 3C) and it says the answer AgF, but why is AgF less covalent than BeCl2?

Johnchou1A
Posts: 37
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: covalent character

Postby Johnchou1A » Sat Dec 05, 2015 8:25 pm

KaitlynWatkins1C wrote:This problem is in the 2013 Final (question 3C) and it says the answer AgF, but why is AgF less covalent than BeCl2?


I had the same question. Since Be and Cl are the farthest from each other on the periodic table, wouldn't they technically be the most ionic compound and therefore the least covalent?

Ellen Hsieh 3F
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: covalent character

Postby Ellen Hsieh 3F » Sat Dec 05, 2015 9:22 pm

Even though the differences are very close, Be is closer in electronegativity to Cl than Ag is to F. So BeCl2 is more covalent.

Aliya Habib 1L
Posts: 20
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: covalent character

Postby Aliya Habib 1L » Sat Dec 05, 2015 11:20 pm

AgF is less covalent than Becl2 because Fluorine is the most electronegative element on the periodic table its most likely to just take the electron to get to the octet state rather than share which is what covalent bonding is.


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