Reason for double bonds being sigma/pi

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Adrienne Chan 1G
Posts: 100
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:40 pm

Reason for double bonds being sigma/pi

Postby Adrienne Chan 1G » Tue Nov 24, 2020 10:46 pm

Lavelle gave an explanation in lecture about why double bonds had to be one sigma and one pi, but I still didn't understand. Could someone please explain it in a different manner?

Bethany Yang 2E
Posts: 110
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:39 pm
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Re: Reason for double bonds being sigma/pi

Postby Bethany Yang 2E » Wed Nov 25, 2020 9:00 am

The very simplistic way I think of it, is a sigma bond is a single bond. So when there is a double bond, or triple bond something else needs to fill it. So for a double bond, you can always start out with the sigma bond (single) and then however many more bonds you need will be the pi bonds. Therefore, a double bond has a sigma and a pi bond. In a triple bond, you would start with the single (sigma) and then the rest would each be pi bonds. Pi bonds are basically used in multiple bonds.

Pranav Daggubati 3C
Posts: 118
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:35 pm

Re: Reason for double bonds being sigma/pi

Postby Pranav Daggubati 3C » Wed Nov 25, 2020 10:14 am

One of the pairs of electrons bonds linearly and the other can no longer bond linearly so they bond in the characteristic "over and under" pi bonds of two electron probabilities.


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