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Lines that Represent Bonds

Posted: Sun Oct 28, 2018 11:32 pm
by Samantha Burmester 3H
Are we allowed to draw bonded elements with two dots or do we have to use the line system? For example, To form SO4^2-, can we put two dots in between S and each of the O’s or do we need to put the line?

Re: Lines that Represent Bonds

Posted: Sun Oct 28, 2018 11:36 pm
by 904914909
Both mean the same thing, so using the 2 dots instead of the line would not be incorrect, but I think Dr. Lavelle uses the line because it is more convenient and clearer.

Re: Lines that Represent Bonds

Posted: Sun Oct 28, 2018 11:39 pm
by Ivan Tadeja 4B
As far as I understand, both methods represent the same configuration but the solid lines are used because it makes things more obvious in terms of shared/bonded electrons.

Re: Lines that Represent Bonds

Posted: Sun Oct 28, 2018 11:50 pm
by ElliotPourdavoud 1A
If I'm not mistaken both methods are correct, it depends on what you feel more comfortable with.

Re: Lines that Represent Bonds

Posted: Mon Oct 29, 2018 12:02 am
by Ashley Kim
I honestly prefer the one where you use the lines to represent the bonds. In a Lewis structure, it's important to distinguish between the bonded electrons and the lone pairs. However, it's more difficult to do so if you represent the bonds with dots instead of lines.

Re: Lines that Represent Bonds

Posted: Mon Oct 29, 2018 12:39 am
by Manas Jinka
Lines are usually standard to represent bonds between atoms.

Re: Lines that Represent Bonds

Posted: Mon Oct 29, 2018 3:07 pm
by Yixiao Hu 3C
line means shared electrons, while the dots means lone pairs. These two are used in different situations and should be treated differently

Re: Lines that Represent Bonds

Posted: Mon Oct 29, 2018 3:41 pm
by deepto_mizan1H
As said above either is fine, but lines are useful in counting the electrons and also being able to keep track of charges when calculating formal charges as well. This continues in to the fact that when we come to resonance structures it makes it easier to visualize the different electron placements than single dots, which can become difficult to keep track of if messy or misplaced. But it is a model that should work best for you and others to easily understand.