7th Edition 2.B.9

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Jamie Hsu
Posts: 31
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:19 am

7th Edition 2.B.9

Postby Jamie Hsu » Mon Oct 29, 2018 1:18 pm

Could someone explain why in 2.B.9 in the 7th edition, the Lewis structure for potassium phosphide has the P in the center with 8 electrons, and the K does not have any electrons and isn't attached to the P, but instead just floats around the P?

EllerySchlingmann1E
Posts: 76
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:24 am

Re: 7th Edition 2.B.9

Postby EllerySchlingmann1E » Mon Oct 29, 2018 2:10 pm

The fact that the potassium ions just float around the phosphorus indicate that the bonds between the atoms are considered ionic, therefore the phosphorus atoms possesses all of the atoms in the model. The way the potassium atoms are floating around the phosphorus I think is pretty arbitrary, they could be any orientation as long as they stay the correct number of degrees apart due to their electrostatic repulsion from each other. Hope that helps!

John_Richey_4A
Posts: 69
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

Re: 7th Edition 2.B.9

Postby John_Richey_4A » Mon Oct 29, 2018 4:38 pm

They basically do that in real life. Ionic compounds aren't "molecules" that are bonded together, it's just really intense static.

Lia Inadomi 1I
Posts: 62
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:15 am

Re: 7th Edition 2.B.9

Postby Lia Inadomi 1I » Tue Oct 30, 2018 6:40 pm

For ionic compounds, how do you know which elements will become cations and which will be anions?

AngelaZ 1J
Posts: 65
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am

Re: 7th Edition 2.B.9

Postby AngelaZ 1J » Thu Nov 01, 2018 11:08 pm

Metals tend to form cations and nonmetals tend to form anions.

Nicole Elhosni 2I
Posts: 62
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Re: 7th Edition 2.B.9

Postby Nicole Elhosni 2I » Thu Nov 01, 2018 11:22 pm

K3P is an ionic compound, so it is going to be a transfer of electrons. K has 1 valence electron and P has 5 valence electrons. K wants to lose its 1 valence electron so it will have a full, stable electron configuration that resembles [Ar]. P wants to gain 3 electrons in order to have a full, stable electron configuration that resembles [Ar]. There are three K atoms in this compound, so each one will donate an electron for a total of 3 electrons transferred to P. K does have electrons, but because the lone pairs in the drawing of ionic compounds only represent the valence electrons, and K's one valence electron has been transferred to the P ion, so K has no electrons around it but it is denoted with a + to represent that it has lost one electron. K is not attached to P because there is no sharing of electrons, and therefore no bonds formed. It is a complete transfer of electrons between the two.


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