radicals

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Nan_Guan_1L
Posts: 92
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:59 pm

radicals

Postby Nan_Guan_1L » Wed Nov 18, 2020 4:24 am

for question 2c1 on the textbook. the answer said that only a and b are radicals. but what about c? OH has 7 electrons in total, doesn't that make it a radical, with an unpaired electron on O?
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Jenny Lee 2L
Posts: 94
Joined: Thu Oct 08, 2020 12:15 am

Re: radicals

Postby Jenny Lee 2L » Wed Nov 18, 2020 8:28 am

Hello! The textbook actually says that b and c are radicals. Option a would not be a radical, because there are no unpaired lone electrons as seen in its lewis structure. So you are correct that OH is a radical!

Leyna Tran 2D
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Re: radicals

Postby Leyna Tran 2D » Wed Nov 18, 2020 9:07 am

yes, you are correct. radicals are ones where there is an unpaired valence electron. There is an odd number of electrons. So, b and c are the molecules with an odd number of valence electrons.

Shrey Pawar 2A
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:42 pm
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Re: radicals

Postby Shrey Pawar 2A » Wed Nov 18, 2020 9:37 am

If there are an odd number of valence electrons in total, the lewis structure usually has a radical present. When you count the valence of both b and c you can see this is the case.

Kelly Tran 1J
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Re: radicals

Postby Kelly Tran 1J » Thu Nov 19, 2020 1:53 am

I agree with the above posts. Radicals are exceptions to the octet rule since they have an unpaired electron or an odd number of electrons. Since, CH3 and OH have 7 electrons, there will be an unpair electron in the lewis structure.


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