Bond Lengths for Resonance Structures

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HimaniMadnawat3L
Posts: 15
Joined: Fri Sep 26, 2014 2:02 pm

Bond Lengths for Resonance Structures

Postby HimaniMadnawat3L » Tue Nov 04, 2014 10:45 pm

How do you calculate bond lengths for a molecule with 3 resonance structures? For example: NO32-. Are we expected to know the exact number or is an estimate alright?

Kendal Reeder 1E
Posts: 15
Joined: Fri Sep 26, 2014 2:02 pm

Re: Bond Lengths for Resonance Structures

Postby Kendal Reeder 1E » Tue Nov 04, 2014 10:51 pm

To calculate the bond length, it is important to take into account the resonance structures. In the example NO3-, there are three resonance structures each with one double bond and two single bonds. This tells us that the bond length is shorter than a double bond but longer than a single bond.

Juliana Smith 2G
Posts: 14
Joined: Fri Sep 26, 2014 2:02 pm

Re: Bond Lengths for Resonance Structures

Postby Juliana Smith 2G » Thu Nov 06, 2014 11:08 pm

I would think that you would have to be fairly exact because we would be given bond lengths for a single and a double bond and then you would have to calculate the average bond length from the three resonance structures of NO3-. For example, if a N-O single bond was 1.8 A and a N-O double bond was 1.4 A then you would first notice from the resonance structures that there is a double bond 1/3 of the time and a single bond 2/3 of the time. Therefore you would write: 1/3(1.4 A) + 2/3 (1.8 A) to find the average which would be approximately 1.7 A (1 2/3 exactly). This average would make sense because the number 1.7 is between a double and single bond yet closer to a single bond length of 1.8 A than a double bond length of 1.4 A because the resonance structure shows the single bond present between N-O more frequently. Hope this makes sense.


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