Resonance Lecture Question

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Stacey Phan 2I
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Resonance Lecture Question

Postby Stacey Phan 2I » Thu Nov 05, 2020 1:14 am

I’m wondering what the L stands for in the formal charge formula: FC = V - (S/2 + L)
Does it stand for lone paired electrons (number of electrons in all the lone pairs) or lone pairs (number of lone pairs)?

Victor Li 2A
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Re: Resonance Lecture Question

Postby Victor Li 2A » Thu Nov 05, 2020 1:21 am

The L stands for the number of lone pair e- (the dots around the atom).

Olivia Yang 3J
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Re: Resonance Lecture Question

Postby Olivia Yang 3J » Thu Nov 05, 2020 1:22 am

It means lone pair electrons or non-bonding electrons

Rose_Malki_3G
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Re: Resonance Lecture Question

Postby Rose_Malki_3G » Thu Nov 05, 2020 10:27 am

It represents lone pairs (electrons not involved in the actual bonding/not shared elections)

Taber Ball 1F
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Re: Resonance Lecture Question

Postby Taber Ball 1F » Thu Nov 05, 2020 10:57 am

Would you count the lone pair electrons individually or as a pair?

For example, if there was a chlorine atom single bonded would that atom have L = 6 as in six individual electrons or L = 3 as in 3 pairs of electrons?

Thanks for the clarification (:

Kayla Law 2D
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Re: Resonance Lecture Question

Postby Kayla Law 2D » Thu Nov 05, 2020 11:31 am

Taber Ball 1F wrote:Would you count the lone pair electrons individually or as a pair?

For example, if there was a chlorine atom single bonded would that atom have L = 6 as in six individual electrons or L = 3 as in 3 pairs of electrons?

Thanks for the clarification (:


I believe that L would equal 6 :)

Taber Ball 1F
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Re: Resonance Lecture Question

Postby Taber Ball 1F » Thu Nov 05, 2020 11:43 am

Kayla Law 3G wrote:
Taber Ball 1F wrote:Would you count the lone pair electrons individually or as a pair?

For example, if there was a chlorine atom single bonded would that atom have L = 6 as in six individual electrons or L = 3 as in 3 pairs of electrons?

Thanks for the clarification (:


I believe that L would equal 6 :)


Ok awesome! Thanks so much Kayla!

Ariel Guan 1H
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Re: Resonance Lecture Question

Postby Ariel Guan 1H » Thu Nov 05, 2020 12:45 pm

L stands for the number of lone pair electrons! So if you were to count the lone pair e- for one atom, one dot would = one lone pair e-.

Jonathan Batac - 2D
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Re: Resonance Lecture Question

Postby Jonathan Batac - 2D » Thu Nov 05, 2020 1:40 pm

L stands for the actual number of electrons (or dots, if you will), not the total amount of lone pairs. For example, there may be two lone pairs of electrons, but L will be 4 because there are four individual electrons.

Stacey Phan 2I
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Re: Resonance Lecture Question

Postby Stacey Phan 2I » Sat Nov 07, 2020 12:06 pm

Jonathan Batac - 1K wrote:L stands for the actual number of electrons (or dots, if you will), not the total amount of lone pairs. For example, there may be two lone pairs of electrons, but L will be 4 because there are four individual electrons.


Thank you for this example this cleared everything up!

t_rasul2I
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Re: Resonance Lecture Question

Postby t_rasul2I » Sun Nov 08, 2020 12:42 am

The L stands for the number of lone electrons, or dots on the Lewis Structure.


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