Isoelectronic  [ENDORSED]


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Hellen Truong 2J
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Isoelectronic

Postby Hellen Truong 2J » Sat Nov 11, 2017 1:48 pm

Are Be2+ and Li+ considered isoelectronic to F-?

Nisarg Shah 1C
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Re: Isoelectronic

Postby Nisarg Shah 1C » Sat Nov 11, 2017 2:02 pm

No. F- gains 1 more valence electron and would have a complete octet, making it isoelectronic to the next noble gas (Ne). Be2+ and Li+ are isoelectronic to He, because they lose their 2s electrons.

Kevin Ru 1D
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Re: Isoelectronic

Postby Kevin Ru 1D » Sat Nov 11, 2017 2:30 pm

Remember that atoms or ions are considered isoelectronic only when they have both the same number of valence electrons and the same electronic structure. Hope that helps!

Michelle Lu 1F
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Re: Isoelectronic  [ENDORSED]

Postby Michelle Lu 1F » Sat Nov 11, 2017 3:44 pm

No, Be2+ and Li+ would actually be isoelectronic to He since Be would be losing 2 and Li would be losing 1 electron. In order to be isoelectronic, Be2+, Li+, and Ne would have to have the same number of electrons. For example, Na+ and Mg2+ would be isoelectronic to Ne.

Wayland Leung
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Re: Isoelectronic

Postby Wayland Leung » Sun Nov 12, 2017 4:35 pm

Are elements isoelectronic if they have the same number of valence electrons but different structure?


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