Oxidation Number


Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

Emma Strassner 1J
Posts: 57
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:50 pm

Oxidation Number

Postby Emma Strassner 1J » Fri Nov 13, 2020 3:39 pm

Is the only way to determine the oxidation number of something by memorizing the rules? Or is there a process we could follow?

Ryan Laureano 3I
Posts: 61
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:09 pm
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Oxidation Number

Postby Ryan Laureano 3I » Fri Nov 13, 2020 7:15 pm

I would just think of it conceptually. If you know where the element is in the periodic table, you can deduce how many electrons it gains or loses. For example, the group 2 elements would have an oxidation number of +2 because it loses two electrons to fulfill the octet rule.

MinjooPark_3I
Posts: 72
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:33 pm

Re: Oxidation Number

Postby MinjooPark_3I » Fri Nov 13, 2020 8:01 pm

When I took chemistry in high school, I had to memorize the oxidation numbers. Group1 is +1, Group2 is +2, Fluorine is -1, Group15 is -1, Group16 is -2, Group17 is -3, Oxygen is usually -2(not when with fluorine or peroxides), Hydrogen is +1 when paired with non-metals and -1 when paired with metals, etc. Hope this helped!

Emma Strassner 1J
Posts: 57
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:50 pm

Re: Oxidation Number

Postby Emma Strassner 1J » Fri Nov 13, 2020 8:16 pm

That makes sense, thank you!

Tobie Jessup 2E
Posts: 54
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:02 pm

Re: Oxidation Number

Postby Tobie Jessup 2E » Sun Nov 15, 2020 1:15 pm

MinjooPark_3F wrote:When I took chemistry in high school, I had to memorize the oxidation numbers. Group1 is +1, Group2 is +2, Fluorine is -1, Group15 is -1, Group16 is -2, Group17 is -3, Oxygen is usually -2(not when with fluorine or peroxides), Hydrogen is +1 when paired with non-metals and -1 when paired with metals, etc. Hope this helped!


this is really helpful thank you!

Haochen He 3L
Posts: 50
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:37 pm

Re: Oxidation Number

Postby Haochen He 3L » Sun Nov 15, 2020 6:57 pm

I think MinjooPark_3F has explained very clearly. Basically, you should memorize those oxidation numbers.

Sophia Kalanski 1A
Posts: 64
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:01 pm
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Oxidation Number

Postby Sophia Kalanski 1A » Sun Nov 15, 2020 10:17 pm

It's just something you would need to know conceptually. Like for carbon, it would be a +4 because all the electrons move away from it to the more electronegative atom

Jacob Schwarz-Discussion 3I
Posts: 55
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:01 pm

Re: Oxidation Number

Postby Jacob Schwarz-Discussion 3I » Sun Nov 15, 2020 11:42 pm

I would think of it like this:
If you have the formula NO3-, and you are asked for the oxidation number of N.
You know the final charge is -1 and you know the oxidation number of O is -2. So -2 times 3 is -6 and so the oxidation of N would 5 in order to get you back to the final output of -1

Brian_Wu_3B
Posts: 58
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:41 pm

Re: Oxidation Number

Postby Brian_Wu_3B » Mon Nov 16, 2020 9:14 am

What are some of the exceptions to oxidation numbers?


Return to “Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest