Identifying Radicals

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Kaitlyn Hernandez 3I
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Identifying Radicals

Postby Kaitlyn Hernandez 3I » Thu Nov 05, 2020 4:26 pm

In Wednesday's lecture, Lavelle went over how radicals are exceptions to the octet rule. How do we identify whether a molecule is a radical or not? Would we just have to draw the Lewis dot structure? Thank you!

Audrey Han 3L
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Re: Identifying Radicals

Postby Audrey Han 3L » Thu Nov 05, 2020 4:28 pm

I'm not sure if we'll be expected to draw out radicals, but you can always tell if there's a singluar lone electron that's unpaired.

isha dis3d
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Re: Identifying Radicals

Postby isha dis3d » Thu Nov 05, 2020 5:16 pm

I believe that if there ever if one electron that is not paired in a molecule it would be considered a radical.

Jasraj Parmar 3H
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Re: Identifying Radicals

Postby Jasraj Parmar 3H » Thu Nov 05, 2020 5:24 pm

If an atom or molecule has an unpaired valence electron, then it would be a radical. This is the same for ions also.

Rich Luong 1D
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Re: Identifying Radicals

Postby Rich Luong 1D » Thu Nov 05, 2020 7:16 pm

Usually radicals are molecules with unpaired electrons. For example, OH will have one unpaired electron which causes it to be highly reactive and unstable.

Lisa Seidl 3H
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Re: Identifying Radicals

Postby Lisa Seidl 3H » Thu Nov 05, 2020 7:34 pm

Another way to tell is if the total amount of valence electrons is an odd number since that would mean that there is an unpaired electron.

Shrinidhy Srinivas 3L
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Re: Identifying Radicals

Postby Shrinidhy Srinivas 3L » Fri Nov 06, 2020 9:27 am

This was actually really helpful for me, because I didn't quite understand what a radical was. My follow up question is whether any element can be a radical or if only a certain group are radicals.

Keon Amirazodi 3H
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Re: Identifying Radicals

Postby Keon Amirazodi 3H » Sun Nov 08, 2020 1:48 pm

From what I understood, radicals are when atoms have unpaired electrons in their outer shell.

Griffin G
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Re: Identifying Radicals

Postby Griffin G » Sun Nov 08, 2020 10:31 pm

If you're drawing a lewis structure and notice there's a single lonely unpaired electron.

John Calonia 1D
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Re: Identifying Radicals

Postby John Calonia 1D » Mon Nov 09, 2020 12:10 pm

Often times, molecules that would have radicals are shown as ions to subtract or add electrons to get rid of the radical, however, if a molecule has an odd amount of electrons, you would know that there is a radical because there is one electron without another electron to form a bonding pair or a lone pair with.

Marc Lubman 3B
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Re: Identifying Radicals

Postby Marc Lubman 3B » Mon Nov 09, 2020 11:21 pm

Shrinidhy Srinivas 1I wrote:This was actually really helpful for me, because I didn't quite understand what a radical was. My follow up question is whether any element can be a radical or if only a certain group are radicals.
I think that only atoms with unpaired valence electrons can be radicals since if they had only pairs of electrons but lost or gained some to be left with an unpaired electron, they'd become ions, which are not radicals. Keep in mind though that some of the elements that are naturally radicals form diatomic molecules because of their natural reactivity. A few examples would be the halogens, which all have an unpaired electron, or oxygen, which has two unpaired electrons.

Kathy_Li_1H
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Re: Identifying Radicals

Postby Kathy_Li_1H » Sat Nov 14, 2020 3:54 pm

Hi! The best way to identify a radical is that there will be an unpaired electron on one of the atoms.

Helena Xu 1I
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Re: Identifying Radicals

Postby Helena Xu 1I » Sat Nov 14, 2020 4:55 pm

Radicals have an unpaired electron and would be identified with a single dot rather than a lone pair or bond in Lewis structures.

Gian Boco 2G
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Re: Identifying Radicals

Postby Gian Boco 2G » Sun Nov 15, 2020 4:51 am

Having a single unpaired electron would form a radical.

Sandy Lin 1L
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Re: Identifying Radicals

Postby Sandy Lin 1L » Sun Nov 15, 2020 8:35 am

Usually, when you count up the valence electrons and there is an odd number you will have a radical. You can see this when you draw out the lewis structure and there is a single unpaired electron represented by a dot.

Keshav Patel 14B 2B
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Re: Identifying Radicals

Postby Keshav Patel 14B 2B » Sun Nov 15, 2020 11:16 am

The easiest way to identify a radical is to first count the amount of valence electrons. Once you do this, anytime you have an odd amount of electrons, it is a radical. But often, they can be balanced you may have just forgot to add or subtract electrons according to the charge.

t_rasul2I
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Re: Identifying Radicals

Postby t_rasul2I » Sun Nov 15, 2020 6:42 pm

Hi Kaitlyn. You can identify radicals by normally drawing out a Lewis structure and assigning formal charges to find the lowest formal charge. An example is laughing gas or nitric oxide (NO) and seeing that the lowest formal charge is when N has a radical.

Francesca_Borchardt_2D
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Re: Identifying Radicals

Postby Francesca_Borchardt_2D » Sun Nov 15, 2020 6:48 pm

I was having trouble with this as well. All of the responses really helped. Thank you all!!

Lauren Sarigumba 1K
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Re: Identifying Radicals

Postby Lauren Sarigumba 1K » Sun Nov 15, 2020 7:04 pm

Radicals are species that have electrons with unpaired spins, which means that they are not a part of a pair. This can be seen using a lewis structure. Radicals are also highly reactive and have a fleeting existence. Radicals also do not fulfill the octet rule because they do not have enough valence electrons to complete the octet.

Yuehan_Wu_3K
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Re: Identifying Radicals

Postby Yuehan_Wu_3K » Sun Nov 15, 2020 7:05 pm

you could use the definition that the radicals are highly reactive and ofeten exist for short time.

Anthony_3C
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Re: Identifying Radicals

Postby Anthony_3C » Sun Nov 15, 2020 7:27 pm

Hello! To add on to previous points, molecules with one unpaired electron are called radicals and those with two unpaired electrons are called biradicals.

A picture here for examples:

Image

Dominic Benna 2E
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Re: Identifying Radicals

Postby Dominic Benna 2E » Sun Nov 15, 2020 8:36 pm

You can tell if there is an odd number of valance electrons or on the diagram there is a lone electron.

Arnav Saud 2C
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Re: Identifying Radicals

Postby Arnav Saud 2C » Sun Nov 15, 2020 8:38 pm

A radical is a species with an unpaired electron. This lone electron makes the species incredibly reactive.

Brian Nguyen 2I
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Re: Identifying Radicals

Postby Brian Nguyen 2I » Sun Nov 22, 2020 9:32 pm

You can identify a radical when there is the presence of a lone unpaired electron. One example is CH3.

Yolanda_Xing_3A
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Re: Identifying Radicals

Postby Yolanda_Xing_3A » Sun Nov 22, 2020 10:19 pm

when there is one electron left unpaired, it is radical.


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